Donate |

Getting support when you have diabetes

Our guide to the resources you need

Published: November 2009

A support group offering diabetes help can be like a best friend. Lorrie DiCesare, 46, of Forest Park, Ill., says she used to think, "Why me?" after she learned she had diabetes. Then she joined Team WILD (Women Inspiring Life with Diabetes), a few insulin-pump support groups, and diabetes groups through Facebook. With so many peers, she says, "You don't feel alone."

Howard Korenthal, 55, started biking more in his hometown, a suburb of Chicago, and learned how to eat right and exercise after attending Diabetes Training Camp. He credits his new exercise routine with helping him stay on twice-a-day metformin rather than escalating to insulin injections. And he credits his peers with helping him stay the course. "I'm with people who are religious about taking care of themselves," he says. And though he's "not a guy who's going to get into a chat room," Korenthal occasionally visits online diabetes communities.

"Diabetes can be an isolating problem," says Matthew Corcoran, M.D., an endocrinologist and founder of the Diabetes Training Camp in Orland Park, Ill. "The camp allows us to bring people out of isolation into a community of like-minded individuals, into a support team."

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) offers diabetes help through camps for children and programs for parents of kids with the disease. Planet D is an ADA Web site for children that allows them to connect with others living with diabetes. "They're with kids like them," says Susan Holden, a registered nurse and certified diabetes instructor who works at Camp Victory near Leesville, La. For the past eight years her daughter, Elise Holden, now 15, has spent a week each summer at the camp. Now she's a counselor there.

Lucy Askey, 44, of Philadelphia gets guidance and encouragement from an insulin-pump group run by her endocrinologist. "You just feel there are other people in the same situation," she says. She has also learned the importance of training someone at home to give her injections of Glucagon in an emergency.

To share your own experiences about living with diabetes or to learn from others, consider one of the resources listed below.

And see our complete guide to preventing and treating diabetes.

Other resources

   

E-mail Newsletters

FREE e-mail Newsletters!
Choose from cars, safety, health, and more!
Already signed-up?
Manage your newsletters here too.

Latest From Consumer Reports

REFRIGERATOR REVIEWS
Find your new fridge at Home Depot, Lowe's, or Sears The stores have deals on some of our top-rated models.
DIGITAL CAMERA REVIEWS
How to take better underwater photographs and video Getting the shots you want in the pool or at the beach requires know-how.
PERSONAL FINANCE NEWS
How to rattle a company's cage and gets its attention Use these surefire tips to deal with frustrating customer service.
PICKUP REVIEWS
Ratings update: Find out which pickup to pick upVideo The 2015 Ram Diesel is the top full-sized pickup in our latest tests.
RETIREMENT PLANNING GUIDE
Why you can stop freaking out about retirement How to worry less and plan better for a secure and satisfying future.
WHAT TO BUY WHEN
7 products on deep discount in SeptemberVideo Our lab tests and shopping tips will help you find the right stuff.

Connect

and safety with
subscribers and fans

Follow us on:

Cars

Cars New Car Price Report
Find out what the dealers don't want you to know! Get dealer pricing information on a new car with the New Car Price Report.

Order Your Report

Mobile

Mobile Get Ratings on the go and compare
while you shop

Learn more