Land Rover Range Rover Evoque Road Test

Model Year Summary

Overall, the Evoque compact SUV is more about style than functionality. We tested a four-door Evoque with the old six-speed automatic, and got 21 mpg overall. A nine-speed automatic is now standard, and it's neither smooth nor responsive. The ride is choppy and noise levels are elevated. Interior room and visibility are sacrificed for the striking silhouette. Controls are a bit quirky. Routine handling is sprightly but becomes disconcerting at the limits. The Evoque's Terrain Response system facilitates moderate off-road capability--uncommon in this class. Updates include new seats and the new InControl infotainment system, and lane-departure warning with lane-keeping assist is optional. Unique among SUVs, a convertible version is available.

New Car Reliability Prediction

Based on the latest survey, we expect reliability of new models will be much worse than average

Warranty

All cars come with basic warranty coverage, also known as a bumper-to-bumper warranty. This protects consumers against unexpected problems with non-wear items. Powertrain warranty protects against engine and transmission troubles. Rust through, or corrosion warranty, covers rust to non-damaged components. Roadside aid provides on-location assistance in case of a breakdown and may include limited towing services.

Extended warranties provide peace of mind. Owners of models known to have worse-than-average predicted reliability can mitigate risks with an extended warranty. Generally, we recommend buying a model with better-than-average reliability and skipping this expensive add on. If you do buy an extended warranty, it is key to read the small print to understand what is covered and where you can bring the car for repairs.

Basic (years/miles)
4/50000

Powertrain (years/miles)
4/50000

Rust through (years/miles)
6/unlimited

Roadside aid (years/miles)
4/50000