Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Road Test

Model Year Summary

This is a shortened version of the Outlander, with reduced rear-seat room and cargo space. Despite the name, when it comes to driving, it's not exactly a sporty SUV. Handling isn't that nimble, and acceleration is just adequate. In addition to the 2.0-liter engine, a more powerful 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine is available. The Sport's choppy ride and very noisy cabin further the driving experience. Still, it has a commanding seating position, as well as passenger and cargo versatility. Top-trim all-wheel-drive versions can get expensive enough that the Outlander Sport starts to compete with better SUVs. Recent updates include a redesigned steering wheel, a new 6.1-inch audio display, and new fabric for the seats.

New Car Reliability Prediction


Warranty

All cars come with basic warranty coverage, also known as a bumper-to-bumper warranty. This protects consumers against unexpected problems with non-wear items. Powertrain warranty protects against engine and transmission troubles. Rust through, or corrosion warranty, covers rust to non-damaged components. Roadside aid provides on-location assistance in case of a breakdown and may include limited towing services.

Extended warranties provide peace of mind. Owners of models known to have worse-than-average predicted reliability can mitigate risks with an extended warranty. Generally, we recommend buying a model with better-than-average reliability and skipping this expensive add on. If you do buy an extended warranty, it is key to read the small print to understand what is covered and where you can bring the car for repairs.

Basic (years/miles)
5/60000

Powertrain (years/miles)
10/100000

Rust through (years/miles)
7/100000

Roadside aid (years/miles)
5/unlimited