Nissan Frontier Road Test

Model Year Summary
The Frontier compact pickup truck's design dates back to 2005. It shares a platform with the discontinued Xterra SUV and the outgoing larger Titan pickup. In our tests we found the Frontier to be quick and relatively nimble, with a stiff though tolerable ride. The strong 4.0-liter V6 revved smoothly and felt very strong, but fuel economy was a decidedly unimpressive 15-mpg overall. A 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine powers base models. Only crew- and extended-cab body styles are offered, but rear-seat room is still tight even in the crew cab. A model with a longer pickup bed is available, but the tailgate is very heavy. Reliability has dropped to below average. A redesign is in the pipeline.

Below average New Car Reliability Prediction

Based on the latest survey, we expect reliability of new models will be 39% below average

Warranty

All cars come with basic warranty coverage, also known as a bumper-to-bumper warranty. This protects consumers against unexpected problems with non-wear items. Powertrain warranty protects against engine and transmission troubles. Rust through, or corrosion warranty, covers rust to non-damaged components. Roadside aid provides on-location assistance in case of a breakdown and may include limited towing services.

Extended warranties provide peace of mind. Owners of models known to have worse-than-average predicted reliability can mitigate risks with an extended warranty. Generally, we recommend buying a model with better-than-average reliability and skipping this expensive add on. If you do buy an extended warranty, it is key to read the small print to understand what is covered and where you can bring the car for repairs.

Basic (years/miles)
3/36

Powertrain (years/miles)
5/60

Rust through (years/miles)
5/Unlimited

Roadside aid (years/miles)
3/36