The redesigned MDX is a functional three-row luxury SUV with a potent powertrain and a well-finished cabin priced lower than German rivals. But the distracting infotainment system and Acura’s shaky reliability of late should give buyers pause. The standard 290-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 makes lots of usable power and generates invigorating sounds the higher it’s revved.
    Acura MDX Road Test

    The redesigned MDX is a functional three-row luxury SUV with a potent powertrain and a well-finished cabin priced lower than German rivals. But the distracting infotainment system and Acura’s shaky reliability of late should give buyers pause.

    The standard 290-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 makes lots of usable power and generates invigorating sounds the higher it’s revved. The 10-speed automatic transmission shifts smoothly most of the time, apart from an occasionally bumpy downshift. But the now larger MDX is about a half-second slower from 0 to 60 mph, and fuel economy regressed by 1 mpg compared with the previous model—though both figures are still decent for the class.

    We found the handling mundane out on the road, held back by mushy, artificial steering. But the MDX came alive when pushed to its limits around our track, exhibiting a well-balanced attitude that made it easy to make mid-corner adjustments. The ride is firm but pliant, with only an occasional sharp impact punching through to the cabin.

    Best Version to Get
    We would opt for an MDX with all-wheel drive equipped with the Technology Package, as this brings front and rear parking sensors, rain-sensing wipers, an upgraded 12-speaker audio system, and second-row sunshades. We would also get the dealer-installed heated steering wheel.
    Road Test Scores by Trim
    4-door SUV Tech V6-cyl 10-speed Automatic
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