The world needs more small trucks. They're easier to park and maneuver and they cost less to feed than their full-sized siblings. This version of the Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon represented the first redesign of the model in 11 years. How to put this nicely? We really want to like this truck. We just can't. If it's any consolation, this Colorado replaces a version that was an also-ran right out of the box.
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Chevrolet Colorado Road Test

The world needs more small trucks. They're easier to park and maneuver and they cost less to feed than their full-sized siblings. This version of the Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon represented the first redesign of the model in 11 years. How to put this nicely? We really want to like this truck. We just can't. If it's any consolation, this Colorado replaces a version that was an also-ran right out of the box.

On the positive side, the pint-sized dimensions make parking a snap. It's clearly the most maneuverable truck in the segment and Colorado's handling is quite responsive as well. Further, fuel economy, at 18 mpg overall, is tops. The cabin is also quiet and offers easy access. As for carrying out normal truck duties, the Colorado boasts a 1,555-pound payload and can tow up to 7,000 pounds.

But this is also where things start to go badly. Despite its 305 hp, the V6 is rather short on low-end torque, which is so important for truck owners who actually haul stuff. Plus, the ride can be brutal at times, with choppiness and jostling. The available turbodiesel four-cylinder has much more torque, and gets impressive fuel economy.

Best Version to Get
Most will likely get an LT. Consider the 3.6-liter V6 to be $950 well spent; it has a lot more power than the base four-cylinder engine, yet EPA numbers show little drop in fuel economy. If you plan to tow a trailer, get the trailering package. Better yet, if you can swing it, go for the turbodiese...
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