You don't see many cars as small as the Chevrolet Spark on American roads and for good reason. It is more than 10 inches shorter and 4 inches narrower than the typical subcompact-and 30 inches smaller than its Sonic sedan sibling. While small can mean easier parking and tighter turning radius in crowded cities or on campus, in this case it also means a lot gets left out.
Chevrolet Spark Road Test

You don't see many cars as small as the Chevrolet Spark on American roads and for good reason. It is more than 10 inches shorter and 4 inches narrower than the typical subcompact-and 30 inches smaller than its Sonic sedan sibling. While small can mean easier parking and tighter turning radius in crowded cities or on campus, in this case it also means a lot gets left out.

Cars of this ilk may appeal to frugal buyers, parents shopping for basic new wheels for their teens, or for city dwellers where parking is difficult. Although this second-generation Spark is much better than the one it replaced, unless you need something this tiny for navigating the urban alleys, several other inexpensive cars are quicker, quieter, roomier, and more sparing with fuel.

First off, the Spark isn't exactly a great deal for what you get. While the Spark's starting price might seem tempting, adding typical equipment like power windows and whatnot brings the price closer to better performing models.

Best Version to Get
Go for at least a 1LT in order to get some basics like cruise control and power windows. Splurging for a 2LT doesn't make much sense, but it's the only way to get forward collision warning and city-speed automatic emergency braking and lane departure warning.
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door hatchback 1LT 4-cyl CVT
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