After about a decade, Chevrolet has finally replaced the first-generation Traverse three-row crossover with a new model that delivers on room, comfort, refinement and connectivity. Not only is it competitive with popular three-row SUVs, such as the Ford Explorer, Honda Pilot, and Toyota Highlander, it beats them in their own game. And it also serves as a viable alternative to the full-sized Chevy Suburban.
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Chevrolet Traverse Road Test

After about a decade, Chevrolet has finally replaced the first-generation Traverse three-row crossover with a new model that delivers on room, comfort, refinement and connectivity. Not only is it competitive with popular three-row SUVs, such as the Ford Explorer, Honda Pilot, and Toyota Highlander, it beats them in their own game. And it also serves as a viable alternative to the full-sized Chevy Suburban.

On the road, the Traverse proves to be a mild-mannered, easy-going coach. Power from the 3.6-liter V6 engine is smooth, with swift throttle response. Aided by an unobtrusive, nine-speed automatic transmission, the powertrain is unstressed and has ample reserve power. It posted a quick 7.3-second sprint from 0-60 mph. At 20 mpg, fuel economy is par for the course.

It's easy to get into the cavernous cabin, front or rear. The front seats are wide and accommodating, with ample legroom to spread out comfortably. For all that room, however, drivers might balk at the left foot rest being positioned too close to the pedals. And, at this price, having just two-way lumbar support is disappointing.

Best Version to Get
We think the LT with leather seats presents the best balance between price and features. Keep in mind that there are more differences between the LT cloth and LT leather such as 20-inch wheels, surround-view camera, blind-spot warning, power rear liftgate, remote start, 8-inch touch screen with nav...
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