With the launch of the redesigned F-150, Ford broke all of the rules for pickup trucks. From its much-touted aluminum construction -- shaving about 700 pounds from the old model -- to available small-displacement twin-turbo V6 engines promising the power of V8s but with better fuel economy, Ford shook things up in a category not known for innovation. It bet the farm on the biggest-selling vehicle in America.
Ford F-150 Road Test

With the launch of the redesigned F-150, Ford broke all of the rules for pickup trucks. From its much-touted aluminum construction -- shaving about 700 pounds from the old model -- to available small-displacement twin-turbo V6 engines promising the power of V8s but with better fuel economy, Ford shook things up in a category not known for innovation. It bet the farm on the biggest-selling vehicle in America.

The weight-loss program and high-tech wizardry under the hood pay off with an impressive 17 mpg overall fuel economy from the 2.7-liter turbo V6. The F-150's 2.7- and beefier 3.5-liter turbo-V6 engines provide plenty of punch even at low revs, with quick acceleration and effortless towing ability. Powerwise, you won't miss a V8.

Still, old-school truckers can relax. A 385-hp, 5.0-liter V8 is also available. While it has the traditional V8 rumble, the two turbo V6 engines have more torque. The 3.5 turbo is actually the best choice for towing, with a max rating of 11,500 pounds. Rounding out engine options is the base, non-turbocharged 282-hp, 3.5-liter V6. All powerplants are paired with a six-speed automatic transmission.

Best Version to Get
We'd get a XLT or higher trim, as the basic XL work-truck version limits the availability of desirable comfort and safety features. We'd also get Ford's Sync 3 infotainment system; this well-designed touch screen is a big improvement over the MyFord Touch system that it replaced. Unless you're...
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