The Ranger returned to the U.S. after an eight-year absence. It serves as an alternative to full-sized pickups for drivers who want a maneuverable truck with off-road ability that can capably haul and tow. The Ranger is distinguished by its strong powertrain and standard automatic emergency braking (AEB).
Ford Ranger Road Test

The Ranger returned to the U.S. after an eight-year absence. It serves as an alternative to full-sized pickups for drivers who want a maneuverable truck with off-road ability that can capably haul and tow. The Ranger is distinguished by its strong powertrain and standard automatic emergency braking (AEB). Under its tough, rugged appearance we found a relatively quiet and fuel-efficient machine compromised by a punishing ride, clumsy handling, and a few ill-designed controls.

The Ranger’s price creeps up to full-size territory quite easily, as it can with some competitors.

The 2.3-liter four-cylinder turbo engine performs with verve, and the 10-speed automatic transmission helps the Ranger respond smartly when drivers demand power. The Ford can move from 0 to 60 mph in 7.4 seconds, and it gets a relatively good 20 mpg overall. But the engine is unduly noisy at low speeds.

Best Version to Get
We would skip the XL and pick the XLT trim because it comes with blind spot warning, lane keeping assistance, lane departure warning, and auto high-beams, in addition to the standard forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection. We would also add the Sync 3 in...
Road Test Scores by Trim
crew cab XLT 4-cyl 10-speed Automatic
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