2014 brought yet another update to Honda's popular small car, keeping the Civic competitive. A responsive continuously variable transmission helps boost fuel economy slightly to 30 mpg overall and 40 on the highway, while an up-level touch-screen infotainment system provides more connectivity features, although it could be more user-friendly. Despite the upgrades, the Civic only scored midpack in our Ratings.
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Honda Civic Road Test

2014 brought yet another update to Honda's popular small car, keeping the Civic competitive. A responsive continuously variable transmission helps boost fuel economy slightly to 30 mpg overall and 40 on the highway, while an up-level touch-screen infotainment system provides more connectivity features, although it could be more user-friendly. Despite the upgrades, the Civic only scored midpack in our Ratings.

Still, the Civic has a very comfortable ride and a spacious interior, with a roomy rear seat. Further, the CVT works very well with the spirited 1.8-liter, four-cylinder engine.

Even the base LX version has plenty of standard features, including a backup camera. EX and higher trims have a push-button start, automatic climate control, and Honda's LaneWatch blind-zone camera, which displays the area to the car's right in the dash screen.

Best Version to Get
It's hard to fault the entry-level LX model with its standard Bluetooth and backup camera, all for $19,180. Moving up to the EX adds another $2,700 to the car's price, but it includes an impressive array of features, such as a moonroof, 16-inch alloy wheels, automatic climate control, Honda's L...
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