The Crosstour attempts to combine the ride and handling of a sedan, the cargo-carrying versatility of a wagon, and the foul-weather traction of an SUV. But this large hatchback variation of the previous-generation Accord misses the mark, failing to return on its multitasking promise. Some of these shortcomings are inherent to the Crosstour's try-to-do-it-all design.
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Honda Crosstour Road Test

The Crosstour attempts to combine the ride and handling of a sedan, the cargo-carrying versatility of a wagon, and the foul-weather traction of an SUV. But this large hatchback variation of the previous-generation Accord misses the mark, failing to return on its multitasking promise.

Some of these shortcomings are inherent to the Crosstour's try-to-do-it-all design. Dramatically sloped rear styling and an awkwardly shaped cargo area reduce practicality. Despite a standard backup camera, rear visibility is difficult at best.

Numb electric steering deteriorates driver feedback, making the Crosstour less agile. A complicated touch-screen radio displaces the previously super-simple controls.

Best Version to Get
All Crosstours are well-equipped, including a power driver's seat and a backup camera. If you want all-wheel-drive, you'll have to get the powerful six-cylinder engine over the base four cylinder. That's no hardship, as the V6 is a highpoint of the car. That said, the basic EX four-cylinder model e...
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