2017 Honda HR-V Road Test - Consumer Reports
GREEN CHOICE
2017
GREEN CHOICE

Honda HR-V

Getting your first car is a big deal. Often your budget is constrained. You quickly realize that $22,000 doesn't go very far when shopping new and consider how low your expectations need to go. And then you start to debate whether a reliable used car might not make more sense. For those on this new vs.
Honda HR-V Road Test

Getting your first car is a big deal. Often your budget is constrained. You quickly realize that $22,000 doesn't go very far when shopping new and consider how low your expectations need to go. And then you start to debate whether a reliable used car might not make more sense. For those on this new vs. used fence, Honda offers the HR-V crossover, a subcompact sport utility (affectionately called a cute-ute in the industry) that contains all the right stuff for practical and affordable transportation.

The HR-V provides all-wheel drive for inclement weather, and its four-cylinder engine promises great fuel economy. Flexible seating and cargo spaces tidily carry family, gear, or both.

At first blush, the HR-V appears to be a fully finished product, while other SUVs of this size come off as half-baked or built-to-price. The HR-V is based on the Honda Fit -- a practical, fuel-efficient hatchback that CR felt was a decent value for the money.

Best Version to Get
We'd stick with the base LX model for its simpler radio. The only feature we'd miss are heated side mirrors. Higher trim versions add some desirable stuff, like a moonroof and Honda's LaneWatch, but they also include the frustrating touch-sensitive audio and climate controls. They also raise the H...
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