Getting your first car is a big deal. Often your budget is constrained. You quickly realize that $22,000 doesn't go very far when shopping new and consider how low your expectations need to go. For those people, Honda offers the HR-V crossover, a subcompact sport utility that contains all the right stuff for practical and affordable transportation.
Honda HR-V Road Test

Getting your first car is a big deal. Often your budget is constrained. You quickly realize that $22,000 doesn't go very far when shopping new and consider how low your expectations need to go. For those people, Honda offers the HR-V crossover, a subcompact sport utility that contains all the right stuff for practical and affordable transportation.

The HR-V provides all-wheel drive for inclement weather, and based on the subcompact Fit, it promises great fuel economy. Flexible seating and cargo versatility add practicality. 

By the numbers, the HR-V delivers mixed results. Its 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine and continuously variable transmission (CVT) returned 29 mpg overall in our tests --  better than some compact sedans. And that's with the added weight of the all-wheel-drive system.

Best Version to Get
We'd stick with the base LX model for its simpler radio. The only feature we'd miss are heated side mirrors. Higher trim versions add some desirable stuff, like a moonroof and Honda's LaneWatch, but they also include the frustrating touch-sensitive audio and climate controls. They also raise the H...
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