Hyundai’s redesigned Tucson leapfrogged the model it replaced, with a smoother ride, sharper handling, and a quieter cabin. This boldly-styled compact SUV now outshines several segment mainstays, including the Nissan Rogue and Toyota RAV4. We appreciated the Tucson’s accurate, well-weighted steering and responsive, nimble handling.
Hyundai Tucson Road Test

Hyundai’s redesigned Tucson leapfrogged the model it replaced, with a smoother ride, sharper handling, and a quieter cabin. This boldly-styled compact SUV now outshines several segment mainstays, including the Nissan Rogue and Toyota RAV4.

We appreciated the Tucson’s accurate, well-weighted steering and responsive, nimble handling. It’s also one of the better-riding compact SUVs, with a firm yet steady suspension that does a good job absorbing most bumps. In fact, it actually rides more comfortably than the larger Hyundai Santa Fe. The cabin is relatively quiet for the class, further contributing to the Tucson’s solid and substantial feel.

The base 187-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine is the Tucson’s weak spot. Although not a problem during the majority of everyday driving situations, its 0-60 mph time of 9.6 seconds is slower than most of its competitors. Plus, even with its leisurely acceleration, the Tucson’s 26 mpg overall lags behind the Forester and CR-V. On the bright side, the Tucson's hybrid version is both more responsive and quieter. It is significantly quicker, quieter, and gets an excellent fuel economy of 35 mpg overall. 

Best Version to Get
Whether you opt for front- or all-wheel drive, or the hybrid, we would go for the SEL trim equipped with the Convenience  package. That way you get a power liftgate, dual-zone automatic climate control, a sunroof, and a wireless charging pad. Our pick would unequivocally be the hybrid for its more...
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door SUV Hybrid SEL 4-cyl 6-speed Automatic
4-door SUV SEL 4-cyl 8-speed Automatic
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