Jeep has refreshed the Cherokee, giving it a face-lift, additional creature comforts, and a turbocharged engine option. But despite those improvements, it’s still a mediocre model -- with little to like -- in a popular and competitive segment. It still suffers from an uncooperative transmission, a stiff ride, and mundane handling.
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Jeep Cherokee Road Test

Jeep has refreshed the Cherokee, giving it a face-lift, additional creature comforts, and a turbocharged engine option. But despite those improvements, it’s still a mediocre model -- with little to like -- in a popular and competitive segment.

It still suffers from an uncooperative transmission, a stiff ride, and mundane handling. And the optional engine doesn’t help this SUV much, as it feels lethargic and sounds more like a piece of farm equipment.

Jeep added more creature comforts, and it jettisoned the headlight design that was controversial among Cherokee purists. But overall, this freshened version is a clear example of a vehicle that looks great on paper but doesn't do so well on the road.

Best Version to Get
We think the Cherokee's original V6 is the best engine choice. The available turbo engine costs more than the V6, making it a dubious value. And we’d skip the base 2.4-liter, which makes the Cherokee decidedly under powered.
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door SUV Limited 4-cyl 9-speed Automatic
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