Right from the trailhead, the redesigned Compass comes up short in the white-hot small SUV market, earning the dubious distinction as the lowest-rated model in its class. It doesn't measure up in several ways. Factor in a price that's typically higher than better competitors, and the result is that shoppers should be driven in another direction.
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Jeep Compass Road Test

Right from the trailhead, the redesigned Compass comes up short in the white-hot small SUV market, earning the dubious distinction as the lowest-rated model in its class. It doesn't measure up in several ways. Factor in a price that's typically higher than better competitors, and the result is that shoppers should be driven in another direction.

The second-generation Compass shares much of its underpinnings with its smaller sibling, the Jeep Renegade. It draws styling inspiration from the Grand Cherokee, namely in the grille and with its softly squared-off edges. But don’t let the similar looks deceive you into thinking this is a worthy heir to the Jeep off-road legacy. Even the Trailhawk version with its raised ride height and red tow hooks is largely for show.

The 180-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine is teamed with a nine-speed automatic transmission. This disappointing pairing results in slow acceleration, with delayed downshifts and a lackadaisical response. Performance feels even slower than the numbers suggest. Fuel economy, at 24 mpg overall, is par for the class.

Best Version to Get
The entry-level Compass versions can be had with front- or all-wheel-drive. A manual transmission is available on Sport and Latitude trim. All-wheel drive is standard on Limited and Trailhawk. The Trailhawk comes with a unique appearance, including standard two-tone exterior color and raised height...
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door SUV Latitude 4-cyl 9-speed Automatic
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