The Gladiator transforms the iconic Wrangler into a pickup truck, using a longer wheelbase and adding a 5-foot bed. Not surprisingly, it shares many of the Wrangler's strengths and weaknesses. But where the Wrangler falls short of modern SUV standards, the Gladiator pulls it off as a competitive small truck with a unique character.
Jeep Gladiator Road Test

The Gladiator transforms the iconic Wrangler into a pickup truck, using a longer wheelbase and adding a 5-foot bed. Not surprisingly, it shares many of the Wrangler's strengths and weaknesses. But where the Wrangler falls short of modern SUV standards, the Gladiator pulls it off as a competitive small truck with a unique character.

The distinction here is that the Gladiator competes in a class dominated by lackluster competitors, and it also has a couple of key advantages. Most significantly, it uses a rear suspension derived from its corporate cousin, the impressive Ram 1500. That gives the Gladiator a better ride than the Wrangler and rivals such as the Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma. And the Gladiator carries over Jeep-caliber off-road skills.

The 3.6-liter V6 endows the Gladiator has some serious oomph and decent towing capacity. Fuel economy is not stellar, but it is on par with competitors. A 260-hp, 3.0-liter diesel V6 is also available. 

Best Version to Get
We suggest opting for the Sport S, which brings power windows and locks, automatic headlamps, remote keyless entry, and a locking tailgate. Then add the optional Active Safety Group (blind spot warning, rear cross traffic warning, and rear parking sensors). It’s also worthwhile getting the Forward...
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crew cab Sport V6-cyl 8-speed Automatic
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