The Soul lives in that increasingly gray area between hatchbacks and SUVs. A boxy, upright design gives it abundant interior space and super-easy access. You sit up high in chairlike seats, surrounded by an ample glass area for good visibility. Overall, it feels like driving a small SUV, but one that's lower to the ground. But unlike a true SUV, the Soul is available only with front-wheel drive.
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Kia Soul Road Test

The Soul lives in that increasingly gray area between hatchbacks and SUVs. A boxy, upright design gives it abundant interior space and super-easy access. You sit up high in chairlike seats, surrounded by an ample glass area for good visibility. Overall, it feels like driving a small SUV, but one that's lower to the ground. But unlike a true SUV, the Soul is available only with front-wheel drive.

Distinctiveness remains another part of the Soul's appeal. The quirky styling reminds some of a surfer dude with wraparound shades. Special edition color packages add to the levity. There is also a generous list of options, many seemingly more fitting to a luxury sedan than a boxy econocar, including features like a heated steering wheel and ventilated front seats.

Three different engines are available. Most will have a 2.0-liter four-cylinder, mated to a smooth-shifting six-speed automatic transmission. Power delivery was just adequate; some of us wanted more gusto when merging or going uphill. Fuel economy averaged 26 mpg, which is good but not outstanding, especially given the modest power.

Best Version to Get
Given the plethora of luxury options available, it's tempting to fully kit out the Soul. At that point, we'd get a fully equipped + model.
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