2017 Nissan Maxima Road Test - Consumer Reports
Producing an honest sports sedan has eluded Nissan for the last two decades. Unfortunately, the new Maxima still falls short of that promise. Although touted as a sporty four-door, the Maxima is nothing of the sort. Is it at least a convincingly luxurious large sedan? Sadly, the new Nissan falters as a haven of opulence, as well.
Alerts
There are 4 recalls on this vehicle. Learn More.
Nissan Maxima Road Test

Producing an honest sports sedan has eluded Nissan for the last two decades. Unfortunately, the new Maxima still falls short of that promise. Although touted as a sporty four-door, the Maxima is nothing of the sort. Is it at least a convincingly luxurious large sedan? Sadly, the new Nissan falters as a haven of opulence, as well. Throw in a $42,000 price tag for the Platinum version we tested and -- despite some high points -- the Maxima becomes a questionable purchase proposition.

We had high hopes for Nissan's new flagship, thinking that maybe this time Nissan would get it right. There's sleek styling. A potent engine. It looked promising. But despite Nissan's ambitions, the Maxima doesn't tick enough boxes.

Granted, it's quick. The 3.5-liter V6 eagerly unleashes every one of its 300 horses, dashing from 0 to 60 mph in just 6.5 seconds while still returning a best-in-class 25 mpg overall -- impressive considering that it doesn't use a hybrid system and isn't a diesel. The trade-off is that it requires premium fuel.

Best Version to Get
We'd choose an SL or Platinum trim for their added safety equipment. The SR trim also has these features, but the stiffer suspension and larger wheels hurt the ride while providing little improvement in sportiness. While the Platinum trim's surround-view camera and quilted seats are rather nice, o...
Change Vehicle