Toyota blurs the lines between the hatchback and subcompact SUV segments with the C-HR (aka Coupe High-Rider). Once we got past the C-HR's avant-garde styling, we found that this Toyota drives decently, but it has a few glaring faults that may take it out of contention for potential buyers.
Toyota C-HR Road Test

Toyota blurs the lines between the hatchback and subcompact SUV segments with the C-HR (aka Coupe High-Rider). Once we got past the C-HR's avant-garde styling, we found that this Toyota drives decently, but it has a few glaring faults that may take it out of contention for potential buyers.

First off, the C-HR isn't available with all-wheel drive as are its Honda HR-V, Mazda CX-3, and Subaru Crosstrek competitors, making it more car than SUV. Second, it is abnormally slow with a 0-60 mph acceleration time of more than 11 seconds. And third, the Toyota's rear and side visibility are horrendous.

Other than that, the C-HR delivers a decent driving experience. The agreeable ride skews firm and handling is quite nimble, making the C-HR enjoyable to drive. The engine and continuously variable transmission form an unobtrusive combination during everyday driving. Any attempt to spur it into a gallop, however, results in a cacophony of unpleasant engine noise and rather embarrassing acceleration. Unusually pronounced wind noise on the highway also hurts it. At least it gets a very good 29 mpg overall.

Best Version to Get
We'd spring for the Limited in order to get all the available active safety features and the more comfortable front seat.
Road Test Scores by Trim
wagon XLE 4-cyl CVT
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