If stellar fuel economy, strong brand reliability, and standard advanced safety features are high on your checklist, the Corolla Hybrid could be the choice for you. It gets an impressive 48 mpg overall. We also tested the non-hybrid Corolla, which achieved a competitive 33 mpg overall. Both versions tackle corners more skillfully than the Corolla did before, thanks to well-weighted steering and limited body lean.
Toyota Corolla Road Test

If stellar fuel economy, strong brand reliability, and standard advanced safety features are high on your checklist, the Corolla Hybrid could be the choice for you. It gets an impressive 48 mpg overall.

We also tested the non-hybrid Corolla, which achieved a competitive 33 mpg overall. Both versions tackle corners more skillfully than the Corolla did before, thanks to well-weighted steering and limited body lean. Plus, the sharper driving character doesn't come at the expense of ride quality; the Corolla soaks up bumps with the best in the class.

But beyond competent handling, these Corollas do little to raise a driver's pulse. Both versions we tested were dismally slow, and their engines were loud and raspy. The continuously variable transmission can cause the engine to rev annoyingly high during even mild bursts of acceleration, which amplifies the engine noise. Corolla SE and XSE trims get a more powerful engine that is more responsive and less stressed.

Best Version to Get
The Corolla sedan comes with a lackluster 139-horsepower, 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine. A hybrid version is also available, as is a more powerful 169-horsepower, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. Buyers looking for the thriftiest fuel economy should opt for the hybrid. We think it's worth the extr...
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sedan LE Hybrid 4-cyl CVT
sedan LE 4-cyl CVT
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