The current-generation Tundra bulked up to take on Detroit's full-sized workhorses. Dramatically growing in size and losing much of the refinement of the previous smaller-scale model, the Tundra has so far failed to make inroads into the Detroit-dominated segment.
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Toyota Tundra Road Test

The current-generation Tundra bulked up to take on Detroit's full-sized workhorses. Dramatically growing in size and losing much of the refinement of the previous smaller-scale model, the Tundra has so far failed to make inroads into the Detroit-dominated segment. Even worse, while all of the major players have been fully redesigned since this Tundra came out, the Toyota solders on, virtually unchanged except for a cosmetic facelift in 2014. Ironically, while the Tundra was once considered the Camry of pickups -- fully-modern and easy to live with -- it now is one of the least refined and most dated.

Easily the Tundra's best attribute is its 5.7-liter V8, which produces effortless power and a still-competitive 15 mpg. Off-road capability is impressive as is towing capacity. A neat feature is the hydraulically damped tailgate that you can raise and lower easily. The Tundra is also the most reliable full-sized truck on the market.

But shortcomings abound. While most big trucks are quiet inside and have matured into delivering a reasonably comfortable ride, the Tundra's ride remains jittery, especially with the TRD off-road package. More modern designs are also more maneuverable and easier to drive than the hulking Tundra. Competing models offer a wider variety of build configurations and options as well.

Best Version to Get
Go for the Limited, which gives you the 5.7-liter V8 as well as blind-spot warning and rear cross-traffic warning without forcing you into a TRD off-road suspension package. 
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