The Best Stroller Deals at Toys 'R' Us

Look for these CR-recommended models at a discount before the retailer closes its doors

Toys R Us store iStock-929981072

After the announcement that Toys “R” Us will soon shutter all 735 of its U.S. locations, shoppers have begun scouring local branches for bargains. Not surprisingly, big-ticket items such as strollers are hot commodities, and many consumers are already finding in-store selection dwindling.

Now’s a good time to get in the game. But is there a downside to buying a stroller from this going-out-of-business retailer? CR reviews the fine print to answer this and other questions.

What Are the Savings?

“Look for storewide discounts exceeding 30 percent,” says Kelly Moomey, senior market analyst at CR. “Patience is key, as markdowns often improve as the store closing draws closer. Visit your local store at least once or twice a week, and a keep a list of backup models in case your dream stroller is sold out.”

Can You Make a Return or Exchange?

Because Toys “R” Us plans to close all its remaining retail stores, there won’t be an easy way for you to make a return. On top of that, once the liquidation period begins (it has been delayed twice already) all sales are final.

More on strollers

“Before you buy a stroller on final sale from Toys ‘R’ Us, check the warranty length,” says Joan Muratore, who oversees stroller testing for Consumer Reports. A good warranty is a safeguard in the face of a no-return policy; if there’s a problem with the stroller, you can always ship it back to the manufacturer.

But weigh the pros and cons. Your Toys “R” Us savings may not be significant enough to trump buying the same model at a different retailer. Some, including Buy Buy Baby, will accept returns indefinitely with the original receipt.

What Research Should You Do?

“Look up the model on recalls.gov to make sure there are no open recalls,” says Don Huber, director of product safety for Consumer Reports. “Then do a search on saferproducts.gov and see if other consumers have had any safety issues with the stroller.”

Also, be sure to register the stroller you buy with the manufacturer. It’s the only guarantee that a company can contact you in the event of a recall. It also makes it easy to take advantage of your warranty, because taking a stroller back to Toys “R” Us won’t be an option.

What Should You Get?

If you’ve never shopped for a stroller before, start with our buying guide to figure out which style best suits your needs. Then read the details on five CR-recommended strollers sold at Toys “R” Us.

To help you evaluate the current deals you might see at your local Toys “R” Us store, we’ve included the lowest current prices we could find for each stroller. If you have no luck finding these models discounted—or available—at Toys “R” Us, look to our ratings of 90 strollers for information on the models you do find.

Stroller Sales: 5 Models at Toys 'R' Us to Watch

Traditional Stroller

Peg Perego Booklet
Regular price: $350
Best price elsewhere: $350 at Amazon
CR’s take: The Peg Perego Booklet is among the best-designed strollers we’ve seen. Every detail, from its easy, one-handed folding mechanism to its nicely padded handle, is well-thought-out and sure to be appreciated by parents without a hand to spare. Although at 20 pounds it’s a bit bulky, it’s also sturdy and maneuvers beautifully. This stroller readily accepts the Peg Perego infant car seat—with these closeout deals, it might be possible to score a deal on both.

Combination Stroller

Baby Jogger City Select
Regular price: $530
Best price elsewhere: $396 at Amazon
CR’s take: The Baby Jogger City Select is a modular stroller that can grow with your child or adapt as your family expands. The standard stroller is designed for a child 6 months or older. But if you purchase an adapter and infant car seat, you can use the setup from birth. The rider can face either forward or back, and there’s space to attach a second seat, enabling the stroller to accommodate a baby and a toddler simultaneously—or two infant car seats at once. The Baby Jogger City Select is nimble and responsive in our maneuverability tests. At 30 pounds, it’s quite heavy—but that also helps it feel securely grounded when in use.

Infant Car Seat Carrier

Graco SnugRider Elite
Regular price: $100
Best price elsewhere: $90 at Walmart
CR’s take: An infant car-seat carrier offers a lot of advantages for the first one to two years of your child’s life. You don’t have to wrestle wriggly arms into and out of straps transitioning from car seat to stroller—the car seat effectively becomes the stroller seat when you click it into place. You can also move a sleeping baby from stroller to car without waking her. The Graco SnugRider Elite works with several Graco infant car seats, many of which earn high marks in our car seat ratings. It’s easy to maneuver and a breeze to fold. Plus, the Graco stands on its own when collapsed.

Travel System

Graco FastAction Fold Jogger Click Connect
Regular price: $300
Best price elsewhere: $193 on Amazon
CR’s take: The Graco FastAction Fold Jogger Click Connect is the rare stroller system that’s well-suited to both town and country. Its large wheels make it highly maneuverable over rough terrain like grass and tree roots—and also help it easily climb curbs. The travel system comes with the SnugRide Click Connect 35 infant car seat, which fits babies up to 35 pounds—that means you probably won’t need another car seat until your little one turns 2.

Umbrella Stroller

Summer Infant 3D Lite
Regular price: $80
Best price elsewhere: $80 at Kmart
CR’s take: The 3D Lite is exactly what an umbrella stroller should be: compact, light, and easy to maneuver. In our tests, it effortlessly worked its way through a course of cones and around tight S-curves. The 3D Lite folds down to a slim profile and, at 12 pounds, is easy to carry with the included strap. Take note: You can’t use this stroller with babies younger than 6 months.


Paul Hope

As a classically trained chef and an enthusiastic DIYer, I've always valued having the best tool for a job—whether the task at hand is dicing onions for mirepoix or hanging drywall. When I'm not writing about home products, I can be found putting them to the test, often with help from my two young children, in the 1860s townhouse I'm restoring in my free time.