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Chevrolet Camaro

2018
Chevrolet Camaro 2018 coupe Trim Shown: 2018 SS coupe RWD Manual
The Camaro possesses impressive handling agility and sharp steering. The optional magnetic ride suspension impressively keeps the car planted. The manual shifter has light, precise throws. Base models use a 275-hp turbo four-cylinder, and the new 3.6-liter V6 makes 335 hp. For the SS, Chevrolet dropped in the ferocious 6.2-liter V8 from the Corvette. All use a six-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic. The easy-to-use MyLink infotainment system is a plus, but the low dash vents tend to freeze your hand when it's on the shifter. Visibility is atrocious, and rear-seat room is extremely tight. A performance ZL1 version is available, powered by a 650-hp, 6.2-liter V8 supercharged engine mated to the six-speed manual or an optional 10-speed automatic.
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2016-2017
2016 Redesign Year
Chevrolet Camaro 2017 Trim Shown: 2017 Coupe ZL1
The Camaro takes classic muscle-car looks and sounds and injects them into a modern drivetrain and body. Our tested Camaro SS was very quick, thanks to its 6.2-liter V8, but the base 3.6-liter V6 also delivers decent performance. Handling is capable, but the car's size and weight really hurt its agility. Braking performance on the SS is excellent, and the taut and controlled ride isn't that punishing. However, the emphasis on interior and exterior styling undermines practicality. It results in severely hampered visibility, difficult to read controls, a small trunk, and a tiny rear seat that is tricky to access. The convertible has an awkward manual release for the top.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2017 N/A N/A
N/A
2016 $22,950 - $33,775 $19,850 - $30,350
2010-2015
2010 Redesign Year
Chevrolet Camaro 2015 Trim Shown: 2015 Coupe
The Camaro takes classic muscle-car looks and sounds and injects them into a modern drivetrain and body. Our tested Camaro SS was very quick, thanks to its 6.2-liter V8, but the base 3.6-liter V6 also delivers decent performance. Handling is capable, but the car's size and weight really hurt its agility. Braking performance on the SS is excellent, and the taut and controlled ride isn't that punishing. However, the emphasis on interior and exterior styling undermines practicality. It results in severely hampered visibility, difficult to read controls, a small trunk, and a tiny rear seat that is tricky to access. The convertible has an awkward manual release for the top.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2015 $17,550 - $45,400 $14,580 - $42,000
2014 $16,000 - $42,000 $13,140 - $38,810
2013 $14,675 - $36,350 $11,875 - $33,225
2012 $13,600 - $31,700 $10,840 - $28,580
2011 $12,800 - $18,050 $9,990 - $15,020
2010 $11,725 - $16,000 $8,940 - $12,965
1993-2002
Chevrolet Camaro 2002 Trim Shown: 2002 Convertible
Despite a styling freshening, a 320-hp version of the Chevrolet Corvette's 5.7-liter V8, and a rich racing history, the Camaro and Pontiac Firebird were among GM's slowest sellers. Though they affect a sporty image, both are too bulky to be nimble. They also ride uncomfortably. Traction control is a worthwhile option, especially in V8-powered models (the base engine is a 3.8-liter, 200-hp V6). Muscle cars as a class can also be hideously expensive to insure, a point worth considering particularly if there's a young male driver in the family.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2002 $3,825 - $7,050 $1,535 - $4,445
N/A
2001 N/A N/A
N/A
2000 N/A N/A
N/A