Instead of "go big or go home," GMC focused on "light makes right" with the second-generation Acadia. Built to comply with more stringent fuel economy standards while matching key rivals' dimensions, the three-row Acadia is 7-inches shorter, 4-inches narrower, and 500-pounds lighter. The result is a competitive, practical, and pleasant family hauler.
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GMC Acadia Road Test

Instead of "go big or go home," GMC focused on "light makes right" with the second-generation Acadia. Built to comply with more stringent fuel economy standards while matching key rivals' dimensions, the three-row Acadia is 7-inches shorter, 4-inches narrower, and 500-pounds lighter. The result is a competitive, practical, and pleasant family hauler.

The slimmed-down body and 310-hp, 3.6-liter V6 help scoot the all-wheel-drive Acadia away from competitors, hitting 60 mph in a rapid 6.8 seconds. Power delivery is smooth, but the six-speed automatic gives the occasional jolty shift. Although fuel economy is up to 19 mpg overall, the Acadia still trails its peers. If kept in front-drive mode, you'll gain 1 mpg on the highway.

Continuing the downsized approach, V6 towing capacity has dropped from 5,200 pounds to 4,000, falling below the 5,000-pound rating of many rivals, including the Ford Explorer and Toyota Highlander.

Best Version to Get
We'd go for a mid-range SLT with the V6, which comes with forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking. We'd add the Premium package to get the eight-way power driver seat, among other goodies. 
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