There isn’t a good reason to choose the Honda Passport over the two better SUVs that Honda already makes—the smaller CR-V and the larger, three-row Pilot. We enjoyed the Passport’s plentiful power and roomy, two-row interior, but we were put off by its stiff ride, ponderous handling, and overall bland demeanor. One of the Passport’s highlights is its potent-yet-refined V6 that churns out 280 horsepower.
Honda Passport Road Test

There isn’t a good reason to choose the Honda Passport over the two better SUVs that Honda already makes—the smaller CR-V and the larger, three-row Pilot. We enjoyed the Passport’s plentiful power and roomy, two-row interior, but we were put off by its stiff ride, ponderous handling, and overall bland demeanor.

One of the Passport’s highlights is its potent-yet-refined V6 that churns out 280 horsepower. It makes the Passport a quick ticket, sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in just 6.4 seconds. Although the nine-speed automatic transmission shifts smoothly, it can hesitate before downshifting at low speeds—particularly annoying when trying to jump into a gap in traffic. Its 21 mpg overall in our testing is typical for the class.

Unlike the slightly larger Pilot, the Passport’s ride is overly stiff, transmitting a bit too many bumps and pavement irregularities to passengers. Like the Pilot, the Passport is a relatively clumsy handler, in spite of its stiffer suspension. The steering feels vague, telegraphing little in the way of front-tire grip to the driver, and handling lacks the agility of competitors such as the Ford Edge.

Best Version to Get
We would pick the EX-L trim which is now the starting point of the Passport line. It comes with desirable features such as power liftgate, heated leather seats and more. Note that a heated steering wheel, can be installed by the dealer.
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door SUV EX-L V6-cyl 9-speed Automatic
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