The 2022 redesign of the QX60 has made this midsized three-row luxury SUV better equipped to compete with its rivals, thanks to its refined and robust powertrain, modern infotainment system, and the cabin’s high-quality look and feel. But its Overall Score suffers because of below-average predicted reliability due to Infiniti’s history with redesigned models.
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Infiniti QX60 Road Test

The 2022 redesign of the QX60 has made this midsized three-row luxury SUV better equipped to compete with its rivals, thanks to its refined and robust powertrain, modern infotainment system, and the cabin’s high-quality look and feel. But its Overall Score suffers because of below-average predicted reliability due to Infiniti’s history with redesigned models.

As with the previous model, the QX60 shares its basic platform with the Nissan Pathfinder, which was also redesigned for 2022. The QX60 is available with front- or all-wheel drive, and the sole engine is a 295-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 which delivers plentiful power. The hearty engine allows the QX60 to make quick work of highway onramps, steep uphills, or passing a slower car on a two-lane road. The switch from a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to a conventional nine-speed automatic transmission has improved the QX60’s drivability. Gone is the rubberbanding sensation of the old CVT, which caused the engine to rev discordantly high at times vs. the QX60’s actual acceleration; instead, the nine-speed shifts smoothly and stays mostly in tune with the terrain. We measured 21 mpg overall on the required premium fuel, which is a commendable showing against the competition’s typical 20 mpg.

The new QX60 has a slightly sharper handling feel than before, in part due to the steering’s quick initial turn-in. But body roll still creeps in noticeably if you pick up the pace on a curvy road, and the steering doesn’t give much in the way of feedback to the driver. The ride is softer and more compliant than the overly-firm Pathfinder; it feels steady and absorbent on highways and secondary roads, where the suspension is capable of soaking up ordinary bumps and cracks in the roads well. But the QX60 suffers from some of the same firm kicks into the cabin that plague the Pathfinder when encountering harder-edged potholes or freeway expansion joints. Panic-brake stopping distances were unimpressive, particularly on our test track’s wet surface.

Best Version to Get
Whether you opt for front- or all-wheel drive, we would go for the second-tier Luxe trim in order to get leather seats and remote engine start.
Road Test Scores by Trim
4-door SUV Luxe V6-cyl 9-speed Automatic
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