The redesigned Navigator differentiates itself from its Ford Expedition sibling by piling on the luxury touches on this almost $90,000 behemoth. This hulking SUV can accommodate up to eight people, although it’s so large it’s probably overkill for most buyers -- unless they need to tow upwards of four tons.
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Lincoln Navigator Road Test

The redesigned Navigator differentiates itself from its Ford Expedition sibling by piling on the luxury touches on this almost $90,000 behemoth. This hulking SUV can accommodate up to eight people, although it’s so large it’s probably overkill for most buyers -- unless they need to tow upwards of four tons. While the Navigator pampers occupants with power everything and a rich interior ambience, there are some deficiencies that detract from a great experience.

A 3.5-liter V6 turbo makes a healthy 411 horsepower on regular fuel, and it’s mated to a mostly smooth 10-speed automatic transmission. (Lincoln says the engine makes 450 hp when premium fuel is used.) That abundant power scooted our four-wheel-drive Navigator to 60 mph in just 6.2 seconds. Its 16 mpg overall is on par with similar large SUVs, but that's nothing to write home about.

The continuously adjustable suspension handles bumps quite well, but the handling feels floaty and disconnected in turns. The SUV’s imposing width means drivers need to take extra care on narrow streets or bridges, lest a side mirror get lopped off.

Best Version to Get
We would likely go for the Reserve with its 30-way power seat which has improved thigh support and a 4-way lumbar support adjustment.  For those who plan to tow, we recommend getting the heavy-duty tow package with its heavy-duty radiator, integrated trailer-brake controller, and low range gearin...
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4-door SUV Select V6-cyl 10-speed Automatic
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