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Nissan Leaf

2019
  • Road Test
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
The Nissan Leaf electric car has a 40-kWh battery. We measured its driving range at 140 miles which is shorter than the Chevy Bolt's 250-mile range, but the Leaf is less expensive. An optional 60-kWh battery is in the works, giving the car a claimed 200-mile range. It takes eight hours to charge it on a 240-volt connector. The E-Pedal feature decelerates the Leaf quite significantly when the driver eases off the accelerator, sending energy to go back to the battery. The Leaf accelerates decisively but the ride is stiff. Its handling is mundane but secure. The driving position can be uncomfortable for some drivers because the steering wheel doesn't telescope for reach. The optional ProPilot Assist can help keep the car in its lane and adjust its speed to keep track with surrounding traffic. Forward-collision warning with automatic emergency braking is standard.
All Ratings & Reliability
2018
2018 Redesign Year
Nissan Leaf 2018
The Nissan Leaf electric car has a 40-kWh battery. We measured its driving range at 140 miles which is shorter than the Chevy Bolt's 250-mile range, but the Leaf is less expensive. An optional 60-kWh battery will arrive later for 2019, giving the car a claimed 200-mile range. It takes eight hours to charge it on a 240-volt connector. The E-Pedal feature decelerates the Leaf quite significantly when the driver eases off the accelerator, sending energy to go back to the battery. The Leaf accelerates decisively but the ride is stiff. Its handling is mundane but secure. The driving position can be uncomfortable for some drivers because the steering wheel doesn't telescope for reach. The optional ProPilot Assist can help keep the car in its lane and adjust its speed to keep track with surrounding traffic. Forward-collision warning with automatic emergency braking is standard.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2018 N/A N/A
N/A
2011-2017
2011 Redesign Year
Nissan Leaf 2017
Holding the distinction of being the first widely available and affordable all-electric car, the five-seat Nissan LEAF hatchback has typical range of approximately 75-miles. In our 2011 tests, a full charge took six hours using a 240-volt power source or 16 hours using 120 volts. Since our test, charge times have been shortened through updates to the car. At low speeds the extraordinarily quiet LEAF feels quick and rides comfortably. Cabin access is easy and the rear seat is fairly roomy. We measured 3.16 miles per kWh, the equivalent of 106 mpg. Running costs are extremely low: 3.5 cents per mile at the national average of 11 cents per kWh. Standard features include a heated steering wheel and seats. Model year 2013 brought a faster onboard charger and a cheaper S version. However, 2013 and later LEAF models scored Poor in the IIHS small-overlap crash test.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2017 N/A N/A
2016 N/A N/A
2015 $11,250 - $13,650 $8,635 - $10,885
2014 $9,550 - $11,625 $6,960 - $8,910
2013 $7,675 - $9,025 $5,130 - $6,380
2012 $5,450 - $5,825 $2,980 - $3,330
2011 $4,850 - $5,125 $2,400 - $2,650