Toyota 4Runner

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2020
  • Road Test
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
2020 Toyota 4Runner Ratings & Reliability
Tough and ready to tackle off-roading adventures, the 4Runner falls short of most modern SUVs. Its rough-sounding 4.0-liter V6 is powerful and reasonably fuel-efficient. But the ride is unsettled, and handling is clumsy. The body leans noticeably while cornering, and the bobbing and bouncing ride chips away at driver confidence. A high step-in and low ceiling compromise access and driving position. Ground clearance is generous, and underbody skid plates are standard. The part-time 4WD system includes a low range for tough off-road duty; Limited trims get a full-time 4WD system. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs. A third-row seat is optional, and the power-retractable rear window is handy. All 2020 models get the Toyota Safety Sense P (TSS-P) as standard equipment, which includes forward collision warning with automatic braking and pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, automatic high beams, and adaptive cruise control. Other changes for 2020 include standard Android Auto compatibility.
2019
  • Road Test
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
2019 Toyota 4Runner Ratings & Reliability
Tough and ready to tackle off-roading adventures, the 4Runner falls short of most modern SUVs. Its rough-sounding 4.0-liter V6 is powerful and reasonably fuel-efficient. But the ride is unsettled, and handling is clumsy. The body leans noticeably while cornering, and the bobbing and bouncing ride chips away at driver confidence. A high step-in and low ceiling compromise access and driving position. Ground clearance is generous, and underbody skid plates are standard. The part-time 4WD system includes a low range for tough off-road duty; Limited trims get a full-time 4WD system. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the radio touch screen is relatively small. A third-row seat is optional, and the power-retractable rear window is handy. Advanced safety gear such as forward collision warning is unavailable.
2010-2018
2010 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2018
By 2010, almost every mid-sized SUV had moved to a car-based design, but the Toyota 4Runner remained one of the last full-framed, truck-based SUV holdouts on the market. That makes it especially suited to off-roading. Otherwise, the 2010 redesign felt like a step backwards from the previous refined generation. The unsettled ride, mediocre handling, cheap interior, high-step-in, and low ceiling left us unimpressed. Limited trim versions have a sports suspension with somewhat better control, but a stiffer ride. The 4.0-liter V6 engine is powerful, but roars when accelerating. Fuel economy of 18 mpg overall is decent for this brick-shaped SUV. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the touchscreen is relatively small. A tight third-row seat is optional. Truck-based SUVs are generally known for their towing ability, but the 4Runner's rating isn't appreciably higher than some better-driving, car-based competitors.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2018 $29,125 - $40,950 $27,160 - $38,565
2017 $26,225 - $37,575 $24,430 - $35,550
2016 $24,200 - $35,075 $22,325 - $33,025
2015 $22,425 - $33,450 $20,445 - $31,245
2014 $21,250 - $26,650 $19,180 - $24,455
2013 $19,050 - $23,750 $16,910 - $21,535
2012 $17,525 - $21,575 $14,620 - $19,345
2011 $16,475 - $19,225 $13,340 - $16,985
2010 $14,625 - $17,750 $11,500 - $15,105
2003-2009
2003 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2009
Like traditional SUVs, the 4Runner is based on a full truck-based frame and is especially suited for serious off-roading. It doesn't provide the nimble, carlike handling of car-based SUVs, but among old-school SUVs, the 4Runner was better than most peers. This generation was surprisingly refined, with a reasonably comfortable ride and a very quiet cabin. Lively and responsive, the smooth 4.0-liter V6 returns only 16 mpg overall. A silky smooth 4.7-liter V8 is also available. Stability control is standard. Thanks to near-bulletproof durability and a subsequent 2010 redesign that cheapened the car, this generation is highly sought on the used market, keeping prices high.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2009 $11,550 - $15,750 $8,595 - $12,595
2008 $10,200 - $13,300 $7,340 - $10,265
2007 $8,925 - $11,125 $6,110 - $8,190
2006 $7,775 - $9,900 $5,040 - $7,010
2005 $7,125 - $8,900 $4,380 - $6,075
2004 $6,225 - $7,725 $3,555 - $4,980
2003 $5,300 - $6,975 $2,675 - $4,250
1996-2002
Toyota 4Runner 2002
Based on Toyota's compact pickup, the 4Runner is a traditional truck-based SUV. In pre-'96 models, neither the four-cylinder nor the V6 engine is very strong. The rear seat and cargo area are tight. A 1996 redesign significantly improved this model's ride, powertrain, and interior packaging. A longer wheelbase and lower floor provide more cargo space and rear leg room. A low seat and high floor makes access a chore and the driving position awkward. We prefer the lively 3.4-liter V6 to the 2.7-liter Four. The V6 and stability control became standard on all models in 2001.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2002 $5,050 - $6,550 $2,415 - $3,845
2001 $4,850 - $6,150 $2,215 - $3,470
2000 $3,500 - $5,650 $1,235 - $2,985