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Toyota 4Runner

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2019
  • Road Test
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
Tough and ready to tackle off-roading adventures, the 4Runner falls short of most modern SUVs. Its rough-sounding 4.0-liter V6 is powerful and reasonably fuel-efficient. But the ride is unsettled, and handling is clumsy. The body leans noticeably while cornering, and the bobbing and bouncing ride chips away at driver confidence. A high step-in and low ceiling compromise access and driving position. Ground clearance is generous, and underbody skid plates are standard. The part-time 4WD system includes a low range for tough off-road duty; Limited trims get a full-time 4WD system. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the radio touch screen is relatively small. A third-row seat is optional, and the power-retractable rear window is handy. Advanced safety gear such as forward collision warning is unavailable.
All Ratings & Reliability
2010-2018
2010 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2018
By 2010, almost every mid-sized SUV had moved to a car-based design, but the Toyota 4Runner remained one of the last full-framed, truck-based SUV holdouts on the market. That makes it especially suited to off-roading. Otherwise, the 2010 redesign felt like a step backwards from the previous refined generation. The unsettled ride, mediocre handling, cheap interior, high-step-in, and low ceiling left us unimpressed. Limited trim versions have a sports suspension with somewhat better control, but a stiffer ride. The 4.0-liter V6 engine is powerful, but roars when accelerating. Fuel economy of 18 mpg overall is decent for this brick-shaped SUV. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the touchscreen is relatively small. A tight third-row seat is optional. Truck-based SUVs are generally known for their towing ability, but the 4Runner's rating isn't appreciably higher than some better-driving, car-based competitors.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2018 $29,950 - $42,000 $27,990 - $39,465
2017 $27,975 - $39,500 $26,160 - $37,330
2016 $25,975 - $37,000 $24,075 - $34,875
2015 $23,750 - $35,000 $21,770 - $32,820
2014 $21,975 - $27,400 $19,895 - $25,245
2013 $19,425 - $24,175 $17,300 - $21,950
2012 $17,775 - $22,125 $15,160 - $19,910
2011 $16,900 - $19,625 $13,750 - $17,400
2010 $15,075 - $18,000 $11,960 - $15,610
2003-2009
2003 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2009
Like traditional SUVs, the 4Runner is based on a full truck-based frame and is especially suited for serious off-roading. It doesn't provide the nimble, carlike handling of car-based SUVs, but among old-school SUVs, the 4Runner was better than most peers. This generation was surprisingly refined, with a reasonably comfortable ride and a very quiet cabin. Lively and responsive, the smooth 4.0-liter V6 returns only 16 mpg overall. A silky smooth 4.7-liter V8 is also available. Stability control is standard. Thanks to near-bulletproof durability and a subsequent 2010 redesign that cheapened the car, this generation is highly sought on the used market, keeping prices high.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2009 $11,600 - $16,050 $8,660 - $12,885
2008 $10,325 - $13,575 $7,455 - $10,530
2007 $9,150 - $11,450 $6,330 - $8,505
2006 $8,000 - $10,100 $5,250 - $7,250
2005 $7,250 - $9,050 $4,515 - $6,215
2004 $6,375 - $7,875 $3,690 - $5,115
2003 $5,550 - $7,225 $2,905 - $4,480
1996-2002
Toyota 4Runner 2002
Based on Toyota's compact pickup, the 4Runner is a traditional truck-based SUV. In pre-'96 models, neither the four-cylinder nor the V6 engine is very strong. The rear seat and cargo area are tight. A 1996 redesign significantly improved this model's ride, powertrain, and interior packaging. A longer wheelbase and lower floor provide more cargo space and rear leg room. A low seat and high floor makes access a chore and the driving position awkward. We prefer the lively 3.4-liter V6 to the 2.7-liter Four. The V6 and stability control became standard on all models in 2001.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2002 $5,100 - $6,700 $2,475 - $3,975
2001 $4,900 - $6,300 $2,270 - $3,595
2000 $3,700 - $5,775 $1,285 - $3,110
2019
  • Road Test
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
2019 Toyota 4Runner Ratings & Reliability
Tough and ready to tackle off-roading adventures, the 4Runner falls short of most modern SUVs. Its rough-sounding 4.0-liter V6 is powerful and reasonably fuel-efficient. But the ride is unsettled, and handling is clumsy. The body leans noticeably while cornering, and the bobbing and bouncing ride chips away at driver confidence. A high step-in and low ceiling compromise access and driving position. Ground clearance is generous, and underbody skid plates are standard. The part-time 4WD system includes a low range for tough off-road duty; Limited trims get a full-time 4WD system. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the radio touch screen is relatively small. A third-row seat is optional, and the power-retractable rear window is handy. Advanced safety gear such as forward collision warning is unavailable.
2010-2018
2010 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2018
By 2010, almost every mid-sized SUV had moved to a car-based design, but the Toyota 4Runner remained one of the last full-framed, truck-based SUV holdouts on the market. That makes it especially suited to off-roading. Otherwise, the 2010 redesign felt like a step backwards from the previous refined generation. The unsettled ride, mediocre handling, cheap interior, high-step-in, and low ceiling left us unimpressed. Limited trim versions have a sports suspension with somewhat better control, but a stiffer ride. The 4.0-liter V6 engine is powerful, but roars when accelerating. Fuel economy of 18 mpg overall is decent for this brick-shaped SUV. Controls are simple, with big buttons and knobs, but the touchscreen is relatively small. A tight third-row seat is optional. Truck-based SUVs are generally known for their towing ability, but the 4Runner's rating isn't appreciably higher than some better-driving, car-based competitors.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2018 $29,950 - $42,000 $27,990 - $39,465
2017 $27,975 - $39,500 $26,160 - $37,330
2016 $25,975 - $37,000 $24,075 - $34,875
2015 $23,750 - $35,000 $21,770 - $32,820
2014 $21,975 - $27,400 $19,895 - $25,245
2013 $19,425 - $24,175 $17,300 - $21,950
2012 $17,775 - $22,125 $15,160 - $19,910
2011 $16,900 - $19,625 $13,750 - $17,400
2010 $15,075 - $18,000 $11,960 - $15,610
2003-2009
2003 Redesign Year
Toyota 4Runner 2009
Like traditional SUVs, the 4Runner is based on a full truck-based frame and is especially suited for serious off-roading. It doesn't provide the nimble, carlike handling of car-based SUVs, but among old-school SUVs, the 4Runner was better than most peers. This generation was surprisingly refined, with a reasonably comfortable ride and a very quiet cabin. Lively and responsive, the smooth 4.0-liter V6 returns only 16 mpg overall. A silky smooth 4.7-liter V8 is also available. Stability control is standard. Thanks to near-bulletproof durability and a subsequent 2010 redesign that cheapened the car, this generation is highly sought on the used market, keeping prices high.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2009 $11,600 - $16,050 $8,660 - $12,885
2008 $10,325 - $13,575 $7,455 - $10,530
2007 $9,150 - $11,450 $6,330 - $8,505
2006 $8,000 - $10,100 $5,250 - $7,250
2005 $7,250 - $9,050 $4,515 - $6,215
2004 $6,375 - $7,875 $3,690 - $5,115
2003 $5,550 - $7,225 $2,905 - $4,480
1996-2002
Toyota 4Runner 2002
Based on Toyota's compact pickup, the 4Runner is a traditional truck-based SUV. In pre-'96 models, neither the four-cylinder nor the V6 engine is very strong. The rear seat and cargo area are tight. A 1996 redesign significantly improved this model's ride, powertrain, and interior packaging. A longer wheelbase and lower floor provide more cargo space and rear leg room. A low seat and high floor makes access a chore and the driving position awkward. We prefer the lively 3.4-liter V6 to the 2.7-liter Four. The V6 and stability control became standard on all models in 2001.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2002 $5,100 - $6,700 $2,475 - $3,975
2001 $4,900 - $6,300 $2,270 - $3,595
2000 $3,700 - $5,775 $1,285 - $3,110