The current-generation Tundra bulked up to take on Detroit's full-sized workhorses. Dramatically growing in size and losing much of the refinement of the previous smaller-scale model, the Tundra has so far failed to make inroads into the Detroit-dominated segment.
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Toyota Tundra Road Test

The current-generation Tundra bulked up to take on Detroit's full-sized workhorses. Dramatically growing in size and losing much of the refinement of the previous smaller-scale model, the Tundra has so far failed to make inroads into the Detroit-dominated segment. Even worse, while all of the major players have been fully redesigned since this Tundra came out, the Toyota solders on, virtually unchanged except for a cosmetic facelift in 2014. Ironically, while the Tundra was once considered the Camry of pickups -- fully-modern and easy to live with -- it now is one of the least refined and most dated.

Easily the Tundra's best attribute is its 5.7-liter V8, which produces effortless power and a still-competitive 15 mpg. Off-road capability is impressive as is towing capacity. A neat feature is the hydraulically damped tailgate that you can raise and lower easily. The Tundra is also the most reliable full-sized truck on the market.

But shortcomings abound. While most big trucks are quiet inside and have matured into delivering a reasonably comfortable ride, the Tundra's ride remains jittery, especially with the TRD off-road package. More modern designs are also more maneuverable and easier to drive than the hulking Tundra. Competing models offer a wider variety of build configurations and options as well.

Best Version to Get
Go for the Limited, which offers blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning without forcing you into the overly-stiff TRD off-road suspension package. 
Road Test Scores by Trim
crew cab SR5 V8-cyl 6-speed Automatic
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