Why the Yeezy x Gap Hoodie Edges Out 8 Competitors in Our Evaluation

In an expert-assisted analysis of fabric, fit, finish, and more, the much-hyped hoodie beat other popular brands, including Adidas, American Giant, and Champion

A GIF of colorful hoodies from different brands. Photos: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

It’s my favorite time of the year: hoodie season! If you’re looking for the perfect hoodie or just want to add to your collection, I looked at a handful of popular options and break it all down for you here. 

I got my hands on the most hyped hoodie of the year: Kanye West’s latest Yeezy collaboration with Gap. (It’s sold out at Gap but being resold on second-hand marketplaces. Just beware of fake reproductions, like those on Etsy.) And I ordered seven other popular hoodies to find out which one I’ll be rocking this season. My personal preference would be a warm and soft hoodie that’s free of logos, but I think there’s something for most people here.

I looked for contenders that fall under this classification: unisex or men’s all-cotton pullover hoodie with a kangaroo pouch. If a brand didn’t have a 100 percent cotton hoodie, I chose one that came as close as possible. I purchased the smallest size available for each style (extra-small or small), which gave me an oversized look without swallowing my 5-foot, 7-inch frame. Prices ranged from $40 to $114.

Unlike Consumer Reports’ tests, which are done in a lab setting, I took to the streets to evaluate these hoodies. In addition to assessing how warm they kept me on crisp, Northeastern fall days—and how fly they made me look—I took into account the construction of each hoodie. 

I tapped Mark-Evan Blackman, assistant professor of menswear at the Fashion Institute of Technology, to help me with the technical stuff. The man knows his hoodies! And has designed many of them, too. Jump to the How I Evaluated the Hoodies section for details of the criteria.

The One with Serious Street Cred

Yeezy x Gap Hoodie

Perry Santanachote standing in her neighborhood park wearing in a hoodie designed by Yeezy.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $90
Where to buy: Gap (sold out)

In an interview with WSJ. Magazine last year, Kanye West called the hoodie the most important piece of apparel of the last decade and described his perfect version as, “slightly cropped at the waist” and “heavy as a winter coat.” The Yeezy x Gap hoodie achieves precisely those specs. The limited-edition nature of this hoodie paired with the Yeezyness of this Kanye and Gap brand collaboration makes it ripe for hype. It sold out quickly despite the memes poking fun that a basic Gap hoodie was being sold for nearly a Benjamin. But the second I opened the nondescript box and pulled the hoodie from a thick paper lunch sack, I realized this entire experience was a departure for Gap … and far from basic.

Fabric: 100 percent cotton. Most hoodies are single-ply throughout the body and double-ply at the hood, meaning the hood will feel and look the same on both sides but the rest of the hoodie will look and feel different on the inside and outside. The Yeezy is double-ply throughout—essentially two hoodies sewn together. “That is rarely done,” says Blackman. “That’s an odd mutation.” It’s the main thing that makes this hoodie unique. 

Weight: I can’t tell you what the linear square foot weight of this fabric is, but the first thing I noticed was how heavy and thick it is. I immediately weighed it: 2 pounds, 3½ ounces for the extra small (unisex). It’s the heaviest hoodie of this bunch and the warmest. I actually got overheated wearing it in my apartment but appreciated the extra layer while walking outside on a 50-degree day.

Fit and comfort: There’s a lot of fabric on this hoodie and while there is bunching in the arms and waist, it looks purposeful. The fabric has a clean drape on the torso. The ribbed cuffs and waistline are tight enough to get that poofy silhouette and keep out cold drafts but not so much to constrict or leave marks on my wrists. The dropped shoulders let me move with ease. It’s a comforting hoodie, like wearing a weighted blanket.

Finishes: There is no drawstring cord, which reduces the utilitarian functionality of the hoodie. The hood might not stay put on a windy day and not being able to cinch it means your head could get chilly on an especially cold day. The kanga pocket is a square rather than the usual rectangular patch on most other hoodies. The only logo is the letters YZY in a navy square stamped on the inside collar of the hoodie. The stitching looks strong and neat throughout but there’s no seam tape visible on the inside seams. Since the entire hoodie is double-ply, I could wear it inside out without getting any side-eye.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold on gentle cycle. The hoodie bled some color. The white T-shirt I washed it with came out slightly pink.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. The hoodie did not shrink one bit but I needed to add an extra dry cycle to get it dry. Apparently, double-ply needs a double-dry.

Style: Wearing this hoodie makes me feel special. Look at me, I’m practically glowing! The fit is oversized but in a unique way thanks to the super-cinched and cropped waist. If this weren’t done right, I imagine I could come dangerously close to looking like a juicy soup dumpling. The color is gorgeously saturated and vibrant and not a hue I see often. While there is no visible emblem to indicate this is either a Yeezy or Gap design, the colors, weight, and fit are telltale signs you’re wearing the hoodie of the year (IYKYK)—a feat that usually only luxury brands manage to pull off. 

The One Your GF Will Steal

Adidas Originals Essentials Hoodie

Perry Santanachote sitting on a bench wearing a hoodie made by Adidas.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $55
Where to buy: Adidas, Amazon

Fabric: A blend of 70 percent cotton and 30 percent polyester makes the interior fleece plush, velvety, and softer than all the others. It’s the kind of texture that would garner petting from others if turned inside out, but the coziness can be your little secret.

Weight: 1 pound, 4¾ ounces for a size small. Compared with the others, this is more of a medium-weight hoodie.

Fit and comfort: The fabric hangs nicely and the ribbed parts aren’t constricting but tight enough to hug my hips and keep excess sleeve fabric above my wrists. The cut is a little more body-conscious and less bulky than the others so size up if you want a baggier look. It’s so comfortable, like wearing a snuggie but without the shame. Just give me a sofa, a pint of ice cream, and leave me be.

Finishes: The details are as basic as they can get, which is how this hoodie costs $55. The round drawstring cord is tipped with plastic aglets and knotted at the ends. There are no grommets on the casing holes, but the cord is sewn to the hood at the midline to prevent it from slipping into the casing or hanging asymmetrically. The stitching looks clean and there is seam tape covering the back of the neck. There is a white embroidered logo on the left chest and a tag sewn into the inside-back.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold, inside out, on delicate cycle. The hoodie bled more than most of the others. The white T-shirt I washed it with came out light blue.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to line dry but I dried it on low heat to see what would happen. It shrunk 1 inch in length in the torso and 1½ inches in length in the sleeves. 

Style: This is a pretty classic hoodie, more of a regular fit than an oversized fit, that would fit in equally at the gym and on the street . . . and on the couch.

The Forever Hoodie

American Giant Classic Pullover Hoodie

Perry Santanachote standing in her neighborhood park wearing in a hoodie by American Giant.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $114
Where to buy: American Giant

American Giant is a direct-to-consumer brand that takes pride in exclusively producing its clothes in the United States. Except for the Flint and Tinder hoodie, which is also made in the U.S., all the other hoodies I bought were made in Asia or Central America. What surprised me the most with the American Giant is the lifetime warranty, which covers material defects (zippers, buttons, fabrics, and other components used in the construction) and workmanship (seams and assembly). It doesn’t cover normal wear and tear or accidents, but any warranty at all on a hoodie is pretty remarkable.

Fabric: 100 percent combed ringspun cotton fleece. Ringspun cotton is made by twisting and thinning the fiber strands into a fine but strong rope that’s supposed to be more durable but also comes with a higher price tag. The inside surface is brushed, making it soft and nappy.

Weight: American Giant says their fabric weighs 13 ounces per square yard. The weight of an entire size small hoodie is 2 pounds, 3 ounces—the second heaviest hoodie I bought. It’s very warm and thick enough to act as a windbreaker, too.

Fit and comfort: I found this hoodie to be the most uncomfortable and unflattering. The smallest size is a men’s small and there is no women’s equivalent to this hoodie. The women’s version lacks all the premium finishes I would want in an American Giant hoodie. The fabric is heavy, thick, and kind of stiff so the extra fabric bunches instead of drapes. What you don’t see in the image above is how much of that fabric gathers in the back, making the hoodie look even bigger from behind. The cuffs are very long and quite loose so I can’t push them up my arm and when my arms hang, the sleeves fall down past my fingertips. This hoodie is heavy but still not as heavy as the Yeezy, and the arms aren’t as long as many other hoodies I tried on, yet it’s the only one I had fit issues with. I think it’s because of the fabric and construction. This thing is built to last, like armor, but that sturdiness makes it less malleable. The key might be to opt for a more fitted size; this isn’t an oversized streetwear kind of hoodie. And if you have a smaller frame, you’ll want to pass on this one until they make an extra small.

Finishes: The contrasting cord with metal tips and matching grommets is sleek and fashion-forward. There’s no mistaking them for shoelaces. But the cord is on the short side and there is nothing to stop the somewhat slippery cord from slipping into the hood casing. I barely tugged on one side and before I knew it I was stuck trying to inch-worm the cord back out the other end. Pro tip: Knot those tips immediately after you get this hoodie. The stitching on this hoodie is solid and then some—the forearms, elbows, shoulders, and upper back are all reinforced with extra panels of fabric. There is seam tape across the shoulders in the same color as the drawstring. A logo tag is sewn into the lower left hem of the hoodie and there’s a tag sewn into the inside-back.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold. The hoodie bled a little bit. The white T-shirt I washed it with came out a faint orange.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. It shrank 1¼ inches in length in the torso and 2 inches in one sleeve and 1¼ inches in the other. (I did not measure both sleeves pre-washing, so I’m not sure if they were different lengths to begin with.)

Style: This hoodie is rugged, like an investment piece for a Carhartt kind of fellow. The complete opposite end of the spectrum from the Yeezy. When I put it on I immediately felt an urge to chop wood or load up the bed of a pickup truck. It looks odd worn with leggings or athletic wear and needs something like denim or twill pants to ground the outfit.

The Unexpected Underdog

H&M Cotton Hoodie

Perry Santanachote posing in a hoodie from H&M.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $40
Where to buy: H&M

I was pleasantly surprised to see this level of quality in a $40 hoodie. H&M says it requires all suppliers and factories to sign a strict Sustainability Commitment, which includes requirements for fair wages and good working conditions for all. They have a goal to use 100 percent recycled or sustainably sourced materials by 2030, and will take and recycle your unwanted clothes.

Fabric: 100 percent organic cotton with a French terry finish.

Weight: H&M says the hoodie is made of 14-ounce organic cotton fabric. The entire hoodie (size extra small) weighs 1 pound, 12¼ ounces.

Fit and comfort: This hoodie has a relaxed, slightly oversized fit with heavily dropped shoulders. The excess fabric drapes nicely. The ribbed parts aren’t tight but stay put on the wrists and hips. The French terry texture is softer and much less scratchy than the other French terry hoodie I got (from Gap, below). The hood is the shallowest of the bunch and the neck opening is pretty tight—I have to tug to get my head through.

Finishes: The drawstring is a flat cord with the ends folded and sewn to prevent fraying. There are metal grommets where the cord enters the hood casing. The cord is sewn into the casing at the midpoint to keep it from slipping into the casing or hanging asymmetrically. There are some errant threads along the seams and the needlework isn’t quite as neat as most of the other hoodies. There is seam tape at the nape where the hood connects and an extra half-moon layer of fabric on the upper back under the hood as reinforcement. No logos are visible, just a plain white tag on the inside back (still no logo) and no evidence at all that this is an H&M product.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cool or dry clean. I washed it in cold water since “cool” wasn’t an option on my machine. It bled more than most of the other hoodies. The white T-shirt I washed it with came out light green. Color bled into the white tag on the inside, too.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to line dry but I dried it on low heat to see what would happen. It shrunk 1¼ inches in length in the torso and 1½ inches in length in the sleeves. 

Style: I appreciate the minimalist look of this hoodie. If you can’t tell yet, I really hate logos and loathe being a walking billboard.

The Last OG

Champion Reverse Weave Hoodie

Perry Santanachote going for a walk in a hoodie from Champion.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $60
Where to buy: Champion, Amazon

Champion claims to have invented the hoodie in the 1930s as a garment for athletes to wear in-between games or practice sessions to keep warm—a literal game-changer. The Reverse Weave Hoodie has had such an impact on modern culture that it is part of the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection. Any hoodie round-up would be incomplete without this icon.

Fabric: 82 percent cotton, 18 percent polyester. The inside is a soft, plush fleece. Champion says their patented reverse-weave fleece is cut on the cross-grain to resist vertical shrinkage. Does it work? We shall see.

Weight: Champion states this hoodie is made with a 12-ounce fabric—which feels about right for keeping a body warm as the heart rate fluctuates. The size small (unisex) weighs 1 pound, 9½ ounces.

Fit and comfort: The fit is very traditional and cut shorter than most of the others (except the Yeezy). The ribbed cuffs are long and tight and the waist ribbing keeps close to the hips. There are also ribbed side panels for added mobility. I find they make putting on and taking off the hoodie easier, too. The hoodie is comfortable to wear and I particularly like the wide hood opening. Its circumference is 34 inches, the widest of the bunch (3 to 5 inches wider than most of the others and 6½ inches wider than the narrowest hood, the Flint and Tinder), and I appreciate that I have full peripheral vision while it’s up. The side seams on the kanga pocket are also 1 to 1¾ inches deeper than most of the other hoodies, not only good for hand warmth, but also good for those of you who keep phones, keys, etc. in this pocket.

Finishes: The round drawstring cord is knotted at the ends with frayed tips. There are metal grommets where the cord enters the hood casing and the cord is sewn into the casing at the midpoint to keep it from slipping into the casing or hanging asymmetrically. The stitching looks clean and even, and there is seam tape along the back of the neck. There are two embroidered logos on the hoodie: one white C on the left chest and one red, white, and blue C on the left cuff. I don’t know what bothers me more—that there are two logos, or that they’re kind of similar but don’t match. 

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold. It bled some color and turned the white T-shirt pink.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. And that reverse weave didn’t do diddly to prevent shrinkage. It shrunk 1 inch in length in the torso and 2 inches in length in the sleeves. Oof! 

Style: Without the logos, I think people would still be able to pick the original Champion hoodie out of a crowd of hoodies. There is something retro about its look but it has held up over time and is being embraced by Gen Zers nearly 90 years later. It has found an audience beyond the sidelines, but I still very much associate it with athletics—in a good way.

Other Hoodies I Evaluated

Gap French Terry Hoodie

Perry Santanachote sitting on a bench wearing a hoodie made by The Gap.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $60
Where to buy: Gap

In order for me to tell whether the Yeezy x Gap hoodie was just a rebranded Gap hoodie at a higher price point, I needed a standard Gap hoodie for comparison. 

Fabric: This was the only hoodie I could find on Gap’s website that was 100 percent cotton. It’s a French terry knit, which means the inside fabric surface has a nubby texture. Some French terries can feel plush and soft but this one feels a bit rough.

Weight: This hoodie is considered a mid-weight hoodie and it’s one of the lightest hoodies I looked at, weighing in at 1 pound, 6 ounces for a size extra small. I would grab this one to wear while warming up for an outdoor workout since it’s light, more breathable, and the French terry is naturally moisture-wicking.

Fit and comfort: The silhouette is straight and slightly oversized with slightly dropped shoulders. It’s not very soft or plush but it drapes pretty well. The ribbed areas are fitted but not tight.

Finishes: The drawstring is about as basic as they get—round cord with plastic aglets on the ends to prevent fraying. The eyelets where the cord enters the hood casing do not have any hardware. The cord is sewn into the casing at the midpoint to keep it from slipping into the casing or hanging asymmetrically. There are some errant threads along the seams and they don’t appear as strong as most of the other hoodies I’ve got here. There is seam tape at the nape though, where the hood connects. Other than the tag on the inside, there are no visible emblems or logos. Unfortunately, the seam from the tag can be seen on the outside-back of the hoodie.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold on gentle cycle. The hoodie barely bled, giving the white T-shirt just the faintest blue hue, which actually makes it look even whiter.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. The hoodie did not shrink.

Style: This is a utilitarian hoodie through and through with not much style to speak of. If I ever wanted to disappear into a crowd and not take up space, this would be the hoodie to wear. Nothing stands out. It’s as basic as it gets. 

Flint and Tinder 10-Year Pullover

Perry Santanachote going for a walk in a hoodie from Flint.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $98
Where to buy: Huckberry

Flint and Tinder is a direct-to-consumer brand that got its start on Kickstarter. The young brand sources all materials and labor in the United States and its mission is to create high-quality clothes without planned obsolescence built into the design—something they say mass manufacturers do so consumers will buy more. While they say their hoodie could last a lifetime, Flint and Tinder backs up their 10-Year Pullover with a 10-year warranty and will repair any rips, tears, or seams within that time frame.

Fabric: 70 percent cotton, 30 percent polyester. The inside is a brushed fleece that’s very soft and fluffy.

Weight: Flint and Tinder says they use a 23-ounce fabric for the hoodie. The entire hoodie (size extra small) weighs 1 pound, 11 ounces. It is quite thick and warm but doesn’t feel as heavy as you’d expect a 23-ounce fabric to be. For example, it’s lighter than the H&M hoodie, which is a 14-ounce fabric.

Fit and comfort: Similar to the American Giant, this hoodie is meant to be a structured fit, but since it comes in an extra-small size, the Flint and Tinder hoodie actually fits me. They also have a sizing chart with very specific measurements for the best fit. This is the only hoodie I got that has raglan sleeves, which extend from the neckline, rather than from the shoulders. For the same reason, baseball shirts are cut this way, this should allow for a better range of shoulder movement. I also like the way it looks more streamlined but if the hoodie is too big, the extra fabric will pool around your armpits. The hoodie feels beefy but also soft and comfortable. I have two gripes about the fit, though. Similar to the American Giant hoodie, the more structured, stiffer fabric tries to push the cuff off my wrist and over my hands. A tighter cuff would help. And the hood does not drape gracefully over my shoulders as a good hood should. It juts out like a shelf.

Finishes: The round drawstring is finished with metal aglets on the ends to prevent fraying and matching metal grommets where the cord enters the hood casing. There is nothing to stop the cord from slipping into the casing, however, so I would knot those tips. The stitching on this hoodie is solid and there is seam tape over the back of the neck. There is a tag on the inside that is sewn into the back so the seam from the tag can be seen on the outside of the hoodie.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold. The hoodie bled a bit, giving the white T-shirt a green tint.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. It shrunk 1¼ inches in length in the torso and ½ inch in length in the sleeves. 

Style: This hoodie begs to be worn in nature but it’s still got a fashionable side to it. I can picture someone wearing it to get a cortado (yes, a cortado) in Brooklyn and then wearing it that weekend while starting up a campfire in the Catskills.

Nike Classic Fleece Pullover Hoodie

Perry Santanachote going for a walk in a hoodie from Nike.

Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports Photo: Perry Santanachote/Consumer Reports

Price paid: $100
Where to buy: Nike

Fabric: 100 percent cotton. It’s semi-brushed on the inside, so it’s like a cross between French terry and fleece (softer nubs but not fluffy). 

Weight: This hoodie (size extra small) weighs 1 pound, 11 ounces, heavier than the Adidas and Champion hoodies but somehow less warm and cozy.

Fit and comfort: Nike says this hoodie has a “standard fit for a relaxed, easy feel” but I disagree. This hoodie looks like a bag of wrinkles. It’s oversized in all the wrong places—armpits, ribbing, and kanga pocket—which make almost every aspect of this hoodie awkward to wear. The cuffs and waist are ridiculously long, like a-third-of-my-forearm long, and the pocket is about 2 inches taller than the other hoodies, so it comes up to my chest, and in no position does it not splay out. The fabric is still slightly scratchy despite the semi-brushed treatment and the outside is rough and … I don’t know how to describe it, just unappealing.

Finishes: The drawstring cord is wide, flat, with a slight sheen to it. The ends are covered with plastic aglets to prevent fraying. There are no grommets on the eyelets where the cord enters the hood casing. The cord is sewn to the hood to keep it from slipping into the casing or hanging asymmetrically but that seam, which should be at the midline is ¼ inch off-center. The stitching elsewhere looks even but the thread looks thin and weak. There is seam tape on the back of the neck and there appears to be some kind of reinforcement sewn into the shoulder seams. A logo is embroidered on the left chest and there is a regular tag sewn into the nape.

Color-fastness: Care instructions said to wash cold, inside out. The hoodie bled a bit, giving the white T-shirt a subtle orange tint.

Shrinkage: Care instructions said to tumble dry low. It shrunk 1 inch in length in the torso and ¾ inch in length in the sleeves. 

Style: If you want to wear a rough scrunchie on half your body, this hoodie’s for you. For everyone else, the style doesn’t matter if you can’t look past all the flaws.

How I Evaluated the Hoodies

Fabric: 100 percent cotton is ideal. Blackman says cotton hoodies will wear better and last longer. The heat of the dryer will break down any synthetic components of a hoodie much faster than cotton. “That’s why people who know tend to prefer 100 percent cotton,” he says. “And that’s why designers who want their things to last longer will opt for 100 percent cotton when cutting a hoodie.” How the fabric was finished and treated can make a big difference in how it feels—its comfort and coziness—but these treatments are proprietary and not disclosed.

Weight: The weight of a fabric is important for warmth. When garment makers refer to weight, they’re referring to the weight of a linear square foot of fabric (the heavier a fabric, the more fibers it has). All the hoodies I got are medium- to heavy-weight hoodies that you could wear instead of a jacket when the weather and social occasion permits. Half of the hoodies indicate in the product description what the weight of the fabric is—that’s a good sign if weight is something that’s important to you. For the others, I can’t tell you what the weight of the fabric is, but I can tell you what the weight of the entire hoodie is.

More on Clothing Care

Fit and comfort: How the hoodie hangs on the body is top of mind for Blackman. “If a guy has a 40-inch chest and he puts on a hoodie that’s 44 inches or 46 inches, how neatly do those extra inches drape on his body? What kind of statement is that making?” In addition to the fit, I looked at the ribbed cuffs and waistline—are they too restrictive? Do they let in too much draft?

Finishes: These details can make the difference between a high-quality or high-fashion hoodie and a disposable one. I looked at drawstring cords, tags/logos, hardware, stitching (how accurate/neat/strong the seams are, and if there are seam tapes (about a quarter-inch of fabric that reinforces the seam) along the inside shoulder seams. 

Color-fastness: Blackman says that brighter and darker color fabrics tend to bleed out the most and can fade over time, so I bought a mix of vibrant and deep-hued hoodies (depending on what was available) to evaluate color-fastness. I washed them each separately according to care instructions and included a new white cotton T-shirt in the load to see how much bleeding occurs in the wash. “If the manufacturer has not chosen a particularly good color-fast dye, it will bleed out in the first washing and you will see an appreciable difference,” says Blackman. 

Shrinkage: Does the hoodie shrink when washed and dried in a dryer? A couple of the hoodies I bought indicate line drying only, but I dried them anyway because let’s face it, life happens, and most people don’t have the patience for a precious hoodie. Blackman says the length of the body and sleeves are the areas most prone to shrinkage, so I measured from the center back of the neck to the bottom of the ribbed waistband and the length of the right sleeve at the center of the sleeve where it hits the shoulder. 

Style: This is the most subjective valuation of the bunch, but I tried my best to express the mood I think each hoodie conveyed when I popped it on. For Blackman, what makes a hoodie attractive is fit (proportion), color, and product identification, which is not one and the same as a logo or emblem. Some designs can have a subtle detail that most people on the street might overlook but anyone in the know knows what hoodie you’re wearing and how much you spent on it. “That insider’s club wink-wink at one another indicates you have taste and money,” he says.

This product evaluation is part of Consumer Reports’ “Outside the Labs” reviews program, which is separate from our laboratory testing and ratings. Our “Outside the Labs” reviews are performed at home and in other native settings by individuals, including our journalists, with specialized subject matter experience or familiarity and are designed to offer another important perspective for consumers as they shop. While the products or services mentioned in this article may not currently be in CR’s ratings, they might eventually be tested in our laboratories and rated according to an objective, scientific protocol.

Like all CR evaluations of products and services, our “Outside the Labs” reviews are independent and free from advertising. If you’d like to learn more about the criteria for our lab testing, please go to the Research & Testing page on our website.

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Headshot of Perry Santanachote, editor with the Home editorial team at Consumer Reports

Perry Santanachote

I cover the intersection of people, products, and sustainability, and try to provide humorous but useful advice for everyday living. I love to dive deep into how things work, and debunking myths might be my favorite pastime. But what I aim to be above all else is a guiding voice while you're shopping, telling you what's a value, what's a rip-off, and what's just right for you and your family.