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Best Cordless Drills for $100 or Less

CR’s expert picks from Craftsman, GreenWorks, Porter-Cable, Ridgid, and Worx

One of the best cordless drills for $100 or less.
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If you want a cordless drill to hang some shelves or fix a wobbly door hinge, there’s no reason to spend more than $100.

At Consumer Reports, we’ve tested dozens of cordless drills, using a machine called a dynamometer to help us calculate run time, power, and speed. And though we do find that the very best drills tend to be the most expensive, for most folks a lesser drill might be just fine. 

"The trick is to know when and where to compromise," says John Banta, who oversees cordless drill testing for Consumer Reports.

Banta's first tip if you're on a tight budget is to choose a drill that rates highly in our speed and/or power tests, but maybe not as well for run time.

"For any drill that comes with two batteries, as many do, run time isn't critical because you can always charge one battery while you're using the other," he says.

An inexpensive drill that scores well in power and speed tests can perform most of the same tasks as a pricier model—just for a shorter period of time between battery charges.

If you're new to the world of cordless drills, our buying guide is a great place to start. Or you can jump to our comprehensive ratings of 40 models.

Here, we've put together an alphabetical list of five of the best cordless drills from our ratings for $100 or less.

It features mostly heavy-duty models, which typically have an 18- to 24-volt battery, because this is the biggest category. But we've also included top-tier picks from our general use and light-duty categories.

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1
Type: Heavy Duty
Craftsman CMCD700C1-10LW
Craftsman CMCD700C1-10LW

    Craftsman CMCD700C1-10LW

    CR's take: This simple model from Craftsman is available at Sears, and, more recently, at Lowe's. It's both quick to drill and powerful enough for most tasks. And though it has only a single battery, it earns a rating of Very Good for recharge time, meaning that you won't need to wait too long as the battery charges if it runs dead in the middle of a project. 

    2
    Type: Heavy Duty
    GreenWorks CK24B220
    GreenWorks CK24B220

      GreenWorks CK24B220

      CR's take: Simply put, this GreenWorks cordless drill offers more for the money than almost any other drill in our ratings. It comes with two lithium-ion batteries and a charger, plus it includes a generous four-year warranty. It also has nice little extras, like an integrated LED worklight, a belt hook, and bit storage built into the drill. It's quick too, earning a rating of Very Good in our speed test. One caveat: GreenWorks doesn't make as many cordless tools as other brands, which could be limiting if you're looking to build a suite of tools—including impact drivers, saws, lights—that run on the same battery.

      3
      Type: Heavy Duty
      Porter-Cable PCC608LB
      Porter-Cable PCC608LB

        Porter-Cable PCC608LB

        CR's take: This Porter-Cable offers a lot for the money, including the power to drive larger fasteners. It's pretty average when it comes to both run time and charge time, but that's okay—it comes with two batteries, so you can always keep one charging while you work. And because Porter-Cable tools tend to be a good value, starting with this drill would be a smart way to build up a collection. It has a three-year warranty. 

        4
        Type: General Use
        Ridgid R82005K
        Ridgid R82005K

          Ridgid R82005K

          CR's take: This slim drill is a Home Depot exclusive. It offers performance on par with the best models of its type. The 12-volt battery helps keep weight down—it weighs a pound less than the GreenWorks above, and yet it has speed and power that mirror beefier drills. It suffers from subpar run time, but as our expert points out, that doesn't matter because it comes with two batteries. On top of that, it earns a rating of Very Good for charge time. 

          5
          Type: Light Duty
          Worx WX176L
          Worx WX176L

            Worx WX176L

            CR's take: This unique drill falls in our light-duty category because of the limitations of its fixed, ¼-inch chuck. But it blurs the lines because it’s powered by a 20-volt battery, which would otherwise place it in the heavy-duty class. It’s a one-off design with two chucks, allowing you to load two bits at once and easily switch from drilling to driving by rotating the wheel at the business end of the tool. The dual chuck might be more of a liability than an asset for some. The mechanism makes the tool a little unwieldy and difficult to maneuver in tight spaces—say, inside a sink cabinet—which might be why you’d want a light-duty drill in the first place.

            Paul Hope

            As a classically trained chef and an enthusiastic DIYer, I've always valued having the best tool for a job—whether the task at hand is dicing onions for mirepoix or hanging drywall. When I'm not writing about home products, I can be found putting them to the test, often with help from my two young children, in the 1860s townhouse I'm restoring in my free time.