Takata has expanded its already massive recall by an additional 3.3 million airbag inflators over the same concerns that they might explode and spray dangerous metal fragments into the vehicle’s cabin.

The Takata airbag recall program is the largest in U.S. history, affecting more than 37 million vehicles and approximately 49.5 million inflators, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The latest batch of cars actually covers three separate recalls, affecting cars from 2009, 2010, and 2013 model years. Each recall covers a different model year and a unique set of automakers and geography.

See the complete list of recalled cars


NHTSA has been rolling out the recalls based on the believed risk to occupants. That risk varies based on the airbag's age, and the heat and humidity in the area where a vehicle is registered.

Regulators say defective Takata airbags are at greater risk of malfunctioning in hot and humid areas and as they age. Older airbags in the most humid regions already have been recalled.

The latest recalls announced Monday likely include newer airbags in more humid areas as well as older airbags in less humid areas. 

NHTSA says to expect additional recalls for airbags going forward.

What owners can do: In all three recalls, owners can contact NHTSA through its Safety Hotline (888-327-4236) or go to SaferCar.gov.

Check to see whether your vehicle has an open recall. Plug in the 17-digit vehicle identification number at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website. It will tell you whether your vehicle has any open recalls that need to be addressed.

The Details for the Recalls

NHTSA Campaign Number: 18E-001 (2013 Models Only)
Vehicles recalled:
 1 million 2013 models from these automakers: General Motors, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Subaru, Tesla, and Toyota. Automakers are to report the specific models at a later date.

The problem: The airbag inflators may explode because the propellant used can degrade over time and exposure to humidity and fluctuating temperatures. If that happens, the airbag can explode with greater force than intended, sending metal fragments into the vehicle’s cabin, and could injure or kill the driver or front passenger. NHTSA says this recall is for select 2013 vehicles that had ever been registered in Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands (Saipan), and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The fix: Once it has been determined that a vehicle meets the requirement for these recalls, replacement airbags will be installed, NHTSA says. This could include replacing airbags that were previously replaced under earlier Takata recalls, NHTSA says.

NHTSA Campaign Number: 18E-002 (2010 Models Only)
Vehicles recalled:
 1.5 million 2010 models from these automakers: Audi, BMW, Daimler vans, Fiat Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru, and Toyota. Automakers are to report the specific models at a later date.

The problem: The airbag inflators may explode because the propellant used can degrade over time and exposure to humidity and fluctuating temperatures. If that happens, the airbag can explode with greater force than intended, sending metal fragments into the vehicle’s cabin, and could injure or kill the driver or front passenger. NHTSA says this recall is for select 2013 vehicles that had ever been registered in Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

The fix: Once it has been determined that a vehicle meets the requirement for these recalls, replacement airbags will be installed, NHTSA says. This could include replacing airbags that were previously replaced under earlier Takata recalls, NHTSA says.

NHTSA Campaign Number: 18E-003 (2009 Models Only)
Vehicles recalled:
 800,000 vehicles from the 2009 model year from these automakers: Audi, BMW, Daimler vans, Fiat Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru, and Toyota. Automakers are to report the specific models at a later date.

The problem: The airbag inflators may explode because the propellant used can degrade over time and exposure to humidity and fluctuating temperatures. If that happens, the airbag can explode with greater force than intended, sending metal fragments into the vehicle’s cabin, and could injure or kill the driver or front passenger. NHTSA says this recall is for select 2009 vehicles that had ever been registered in Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The fix: Once it has been determined that a vehicle meets the requirement for these recalls, replacement airbags will be installed, NHTSA says. This could include replacing airbags that were previously replaced under earlier Takata recalls, NHTSA says.