Best Robotic Vacuums of 2020

Consumer Reports' testing reveals that robovacs are no longer just for gadget geeks

This robotic vacuum cleaning the floor is representative of the best robotic vacuums of 2019.
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Robotic vacuums have come a long way. The latest iterations have stronger suction, better edge-cleaning capabilities, and improved programming. And you no longer have to spend $1,000 to get great performance. 

“Although robotic vacuum suction power can’t compare to the suction on upright vacuums, it can go a long way toward helping you maintain grit-free floors,” says Susan Booth, the Consumer Reports test engineer who oversees our vacuum tests. 

Booth and her team evaluate how well each robotic vacuum removes surface debris on low-pile carpet and on bare floors, whether it can get into tight corners, and the precise length of time it takes to clean a designated area.

If you’re thinking of purchasing one of these little machines, consider your flooring (some are better on carpet, others on bare floors), the layout of your home, and the types of detritus your home generates (pet hair, kid spills).

Here, listed in alphabetical order—not by rank—are seven standouts from CR’s robotic vacuum tests.

Eufy 11S
Eufy 11S

    Eufy 11S

    CR’s take: You don’t need to shell out hundreds and hundreds of dollars for a good robotic vacuum. Typically selling for around $220, the Eufy RoboVac 11S earns a Very Good rating in our carpet cleaning test and does even better on bare floors. While it’s not the most efficient cleaner, and testers noted that it sometimes scatters debris, it does the job, operates quietly (like many robotic vacuums), and has a cliff sensor to keep it from tumbling down stairs. This robotic vacuum is not WiFi-enabled and can’t be used with a smartphone app.

    Eufy RoboVac 11S Max
    Eufy RoboVac 11S Max

      Eufy RoboVac 11S Max

      CR's take: Another stellar Eufy vacuum, the 11S Max has a longer average run time than both the 11S (above) and the 30C (below)—95 minutes. Our tests found that the Eufy 11S Max lacks the great navigation capabilities that those two brandmates have. Still, it earns an Excellent rating for cleaning bare floors, which is no small feat. This robotic vacuum is not WiFi-enabled and can't be used with a smartphone app.

      Eufy 30C
      Eufy 30C

        Eufy 30C

        CR’s take: The Eufy 30C is an extremely quiet vacuum. Our testers note that they couldn’t even tell it was on or running, which makes it a great choice for those who might need to run a robotic vac while they’re home. This is one of the cheaper vacuums that really does the job: It earns an Excellent rating for bare floors. This vacuum is compatible with Google Assistant or Amazon Alexa; you can also program the robot through the manufacturer’s app.

        iRobot Roomba e5
        iRobot Roomba e5

          iRobot Roomba e5

          CR’s take: iRobot has been building robotic vacuums since the early 2000s, and the iRobot Roomba e5 is one of our top models for good reason: It earns Excellent ratings for surface carpet cleaning and bare floors. At less than $500, it falls in the middle of our picks, pricewise. This Roomba does not have a remote control, but you can schedule its cleaning times from an app and review its cleaning pattern after it’s finished.

          LG Hom-Bot CR5765GD
          LG Hom-Bot CR5765GD

            LG Hom-Bot CR5765GD

            CR’s take: The LG Hom-Bot CR5765GD is pricey, but it has the performance to match in CR’s test labs. This vacuum adjusts its suction based on the type of floor it’s cleaning. In our tests, it earns an Excellent rating for bare floors. You’ll need to download the manufacturer’s app to your smartphone to program your setting. You can also give the Hom-Bot certain voice commands through Google Assistant or Amazon Alexa. One unique feature: The Hom-Bot can detect movement in your home and can take photos and video of your space, which it can send to your phone—more of an extra set of eyes than a replacement for a home security system.

            Samsung POWERbot R7040
            Samsung POWERbot R7040

              Samsung POWERbot R7040

              CR’s take: The Samsung R7040 costs a few hundred dollars less than Samsung’s stellar-performing robotic vacuum, the R7065, below. But you’re still getting a great vacuum for your money. The average total run time on our surfaces was around 49 minutes before this robotic vacuum thought it was done cleaning (the battery was not depleted), compared with 86 minutes for the R7065. Both models earn an Excellent rating for bare floors and carpet cleaning. The R7040 earns a higher ease-of-use rating than the R7065. Samsung's Smart Things app allows you to check the status of the bot as well as schedule it and view cleaning history.

              Samsung POWERbot R7065 VR2AM7065WS/AA
              Samsung POWERbot R7065 VR2AM7065WS/AA

                Samsung POWERbot R7065 VR2AM7065WS/AA

                CR’s take: The sleek Samsung Powerbot earns high marks, including an Excellent rating for bare floors. It’s also superb at cleaning carpet. A couple of key design details separate it from the competition, such as its ability to clean along walls: It’s equipped with a shutter brush that extends down to sweep up dirt only when it nears a wall—an improvement over side brushes that are out at all times and can scatter debris. As for power, the Samsung Powerbot is able to pick up fine grains of sand and embedded pet hair from carpets. (You have to manually clean the pet hair from the brush.) Samsung's Smart Things app allows you to check the status of the bot as well as schedule it and view cleaning history. 

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                Haniya Rae

                I​’m interested in the intersection between design and technology​—whether for ​drywall or robotic vacuums—and how the resulting combination affects consumers. I’ve written about consumer advocacy issues for publications like The Atlantic, PC Magazine, and Popular Science, and now I’m happy to be tackling the topic for CR. For updates, feel free to follow me on Twitter (@haniyarae).