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Certified used cars

These help give buyers peace of mind

Last updated: May 2014

Most automakers and some dealerships have developed certification systems that are intended to give buyers greater peace of mind when buying a used car. Certified used cars are billed as the cream of the crop, inspected and recon­ditioned according to stringent guide­lines. But they can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars more than noncert­ified vehicles.

Programs usually require candidates for certification be no more than five years old and have less than 60,000 or 70,000 miles. Manufacturer pro­grams also routinely exclude cars that have a suspicious title history or other seri­ous flaws.

Typically, the dealership screens, inspects, and reconditions the vehicle. The automaker then certifies that the car is sound and gives it a manufacturer-backed warranty. The warranty terms can differ significantly from one brand to another. Some start coverage from the date the car was first sold. Others begin when you buy the certified vehicle.

Certification programs also typi­cally throw in enhancements such as road­side assistance and trip interruption insurance. Since those items are gen­erally available through an auto-club membership, and shouldn’t be a decid­ing factor.

The term “certified” doesn’t actually mean much. It has no legal definition and no watchdog agency oversees its use. Any used-car dealer can call a car certified. As a result, you’ll sometimes see a car labeled “certified” that has not undergone any reconditioning. It may carry only a service contract, the cost of which is rolled into the vehi­cle’s price.

Some aftermarket warran­ty programs that look like a manu­facturer’s certification. These “dealer certification” programs are underwrit­ten by warranty companies, insurers that sell a program to dealers who then resell it to consumers. Because the quality and terms of such contracts vary widely, it’s especially im­portant to read the fine print care­fully. Unscrupulous dealers can mislead car shoppers about the certification status of a given car, so it’s important to be wary.

Don’t assume that a certified car is worth the pre­mi­um price. You should expect a late-model, low-mileage car, you should expect it to be in good condition, anyway. Negotiate the price as you would any other used car.

When considering any certified car, ask the dealer specific questions:

  • Is the vehicle covered by a manufacturer-certified program or by a third-party plan sold by the dealer? Non-manufacturer plans are wild cards because they can vary greatly in quality.
  • What does the warranty cover, and for how long? Ask to see a copy of the warranty contract, not just a glossy brochure. Read the fine print.
  • Is there a deductible? If there is a charge for service, find out how much it is and whether you must pay it for each item serviced or for each service call. Ask about other fees, such as a “diagnostic” fee that’s added to the deductible.
  • Who provides the service? Ask whether you have to bring the car back to the orig­inal dealership for warranty work, or whether any same-brand dealership is fine. Ask what you’re required to do in an emergency.

If you are buying a well-maintained car with a good record of reliability, you aren’t taking much of a risk if you skip the certification route. But the real key for your peace of mind when buying a used vehicle is to have it thoroughly inspected by an independent mechanic.

Used car buying guide

Learn more about choosing a used car, avoiding a lemon, buying and selling a used car, pricing and financing, and more in our used car buying guide.


   

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