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"No haggle" prices

Take the stress out of the car buying process

Last updated: March 2014

One-price, no-haggle, no-hassle, up­front pricing, and value pricing are all dif­fer­ent names for the same practice: sell­ing a vehicle at a nonnegotiable price. It’s marketed as a way to take the stress of haggling out of the buying process. No-haggle outlets often dis­count their prices below the MSRP, but you can often get an even lower one by negotiating.

At the CarsDirect website you can choose a single, no-haggle price for the vehicle you want or get price quotes from contracted dealerships, just as you can at other websites.

Other options are places like Sam’s Club, Costco, or BJ’s Wholesale Club, where you can get a set price that’s been prenegotiated with local dealerships. Once you make the purchase, you then go to the appropriate dealership to get the car.

There is also Consumer Reports' Build & Buy Car Buying Service, a time- and money-saving program that provides competitive prices from local dealers who are held accountable for high customer satisfaction. It is available as an extra benefit to ConsumerReports.org, Shop Smart, Consumer Reports, on Health, and Money Advisor newsletter subscribers and to purchasers of Consumer Reports New Car Price Reports. Participating dealers have agreed to sell their vehicles at competitive prices that are typically well below the manufacturer's suggested retail price and sometimes below the dealer-invoice price. The program includes more than 5,500 participating dealers nationwide who have agreed to follow strict guidelines of conduct in order to help provide an easier, more transparent, and consumer-friendly car-buying experience. To access the service, visit our Build & Buy Car Buying Service home page.

Not having to negotiate a vehicle’s price may seem to make things simpler, but you still shouldn’t go to a dealership unprepared. There are other variables that can cost you extra money. If you don’t get the full value of your trade-in, for example, it could substantially alter the effectiveness of your deal. In addi­­tion, you can still be pressured to buy options and/or unnecessary extras that will inflate the overall price.

Even if you intend to negotiate the price, you can use no-haggle outlets just as you do comparative price quotes. If you know that a dealership is willing to sell a vehicle at a set price, then you know that no matter which dealership you talk with, you don’t need to pay more than that price.

New Car Buying Guide

Learn more about choosing a car, what to do at the dealership, pricing, trading in your car, financing, closing the deal and more in our new car buying guide.




   

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