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Supermarkets

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What's behind our supermarket Ratings?

The Consumer Reports National Research Center comprises highly trained social scientists, including 9 Ph.D.s, using state-of-the-art techniques to survey more than 1 million consumers each year about products, services, health care and consumer issues.
We look for:
  • Reader score
    A score of 100 means all respondents were completely satisfied; 80 would mean very satisfied, on average; 60, fairly well satisfied; 40, somewhat dissatisfied.
  • Service
    Average of checkout speed and employee courtesy ratings.
  • Price satisfaction
    Satisfaction with price paid.
  • Cleanliness
    Satisfaction rating of store cleanliness.
  • Perishables
    Average of meat and produce ratings.

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Shoppers have a lot invested in their supermarkets, making 88 trips and spending $5,060 a year on average. In this sour economy, they’re finding more good deals. The Food Marketing Institute, a trade group, says that 36 percent of grocers it surveyed are featuring more promotions and deeper sales. If you're looking for information about supermarkets, Consumer Reports is your best resource. Consumer Reports’ supermarket reviews will give you honest advice that you can trust. Use our supermarket buying guide to discover which features are most important to consider. We also provide unbiased Ratings and supermarket reviews to help you choose the best supermarket for your needs.

Supermarket buying guide

Supermarket buying guide

One-third of subscribers we surveyed in our most recent Annual Questionnaire said they had given the heave-ho to a nearby grocery store. Forty-three percent left a grocer in search of lower prices (up 15 percentage points since our previous survey), about 25 percent cited poor selection, long lines, or lousy food, 17 percent blamed employee rudeness, and 14 percent cited the crowds.

High food prices and high unemployment are at least partly to blame for consumer willingness to switch stores. "The Great Recession spurred consumer trial of many extreme-value formats, like Aldi's limited-assortment stores," said Jim Hertel, a partner with Willard Bishop, retail consultants in Barrington, Ill. "Many shoppers found them more than acceptable. Consumers are still nervous,and they have more alternatives."

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