Current Model
The redesigned fourth-generation Tucson is one of the better compact SUVs. With the standard 187-hp, 2.5-liter four-cylinder coupled to an eight-speed automatic transmission, the Tucson accelerates leisurely.
The hybrid's pairing of a 1.6-liter turbo engine and electric assist makes it more responsive and quieter. It got an impressive 35 mpg overall in our tests. The ride is firm yet steady, handling is responsive and secure, and the nicely trimmed cabin is relatively quiet. The back seat is roomy, and the cargo area is generous for the class. Controls are easy to use. But higher trims replace physical volume and temperature knobs with touch-sensitive controls and a push-button gear selector. Standard active safety features include FCW, AEB with pedestrian detection, BSW, LDW, and LKA.
Road Test
Predicted Reliability
Predicted Owner Satisfaction
2016-2021
2016 Redesign Year
The redesigned-for-2016 Tucson shares only its name with the previous generation. Now it's more inline with the larger Santa Fe Sport and Santa Fe SUVs.
The overall package is more competitive against the segment leaders. The base version has a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, linked to a six-speed automatic. This version is rather slow and returned 24 mpg overall. More expensive trims get a 1.6-liter turbo four-cylinder that uses a seven-speed automated manual transmission. This quieter and quicker setup returned 26 mpg overall, but it suffers from a vibration at very low speed, such as in parking maneuvers. Otherwise, ride comfort is pliant and composed, handling is responsive and secure, and the cabin is quiet. Controls are easy to use, and the rear seat is roomy. The Tucson has available lane departure warning, blind-spot warning, and forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking. A new 181-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine mated to a six-speed automatic arrived in 2018. In our tests, it was faster than the 2.0-liter but returned only 22 mpg overall. The Tucson got a freshening for 2019 which included replacing the previous top-level engine choice (1.6-liter turbo mated to a clunky seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission) with a 2.4-liter and a regular automatic. A few interior touches, such as an electronic parking brake, were introduced as well.
$25,625 - $33,775
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$23,225 - $30,800
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$20,900 - $27,775
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$18,450 - $23,575
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$16,975 - $20,700
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$15,225 - $17,675
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
2010-2015
2010 Redesign Year
A decided improvement over its predecessor, the Tucson's 2010 to 2015 version was practical. However it was an also-ran in the crowded small SUV space.
The only engine was a 2.4-liter four cylinder, which supplied decent acceleration, but tended to be noisy and unpleasant when pushed. It got 22 mpg overall. Handling was secure and responsive, but the ride was stiff and road noise pronounced. Cabin furnishings are quite basic with hard plastics, but controls are easy to use. This generation's styling also compromised cargo space and severely hampered outward visibility. While this generation did better in crash tests than pre-2010 models, it did poorly in the IIHS narrow offset crash test.
$12,325 - $15,725
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$11,000 - $13,500
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$9,500 - $11,825
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$8,050 - $10,300
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$6,875 - $9,475
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$7,450 - $8,875
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
2005-2009
2005 Redesign Year
This version of the Tucson doesn't have much going for it. Crash protection wasn't up to snuff; the standard 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine is not very zippy and is rather noisy.
The optional 2.7-liter V6 delivers decent acceleration, but fuel economy is unimpressive. Handling is clumsy, but secure thanks to the standard stability control. The ride is fairly comfortable, but marred by suspension noise. Basically, skip this generation, look to the next one for a better execution all around.
$5,975 - $7,650
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$4,975 - $5,775
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$4,975 - $5,800
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$4,500 - $5,100
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
$3,325 - $3,900
Average Retail Price
RELIABILITY VERDICT
OWNER SATISFACTION
OWNER REPORTED MPG
Hyundai Tucson News & Videos
Ready to Shop Local Inventory?
Select Another Vehicle