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Jeep Wrangler

2018
Jeep Wrangler 2018 4-door SUV Trim Shown: 2018 Sahara 4-door SUV 4WD Automatic
  • Road Test
    N/A
  • Predicted Reliability
  • Predicted Owner Satisfaction
The redesigned 2018 Jeep Wrangler aims to modernize the off-roading icon, while remaining true to its heritage. The essential Wrangler hallmarks remain, with a body-on-frame construction and two solid axles. The distinctive silhouette traces back to WWII, seven-slot grille, round headlamps, square tail lamps, and removable top and doors. The Wrangler will again be offered in two-door and extended-length four-door configurations. The Jeep is expected to offer both a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine and a 3.6-liter V6, teamed with a start/stop system and choice of eight-speed automatic transmission or a six-speed manual transmission. Jeep offers some advanced safety features such as blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, roll mitigation, and a rearview camera with dynamic guidelines. A diesel engine will come in 2019. The outgoing model is still sold as the Wrangler JK.
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2007-2017
2007 Redesign Year
Jeep Wrangler 2017 Trim Shown: 2017 Sport/Sport S
The Wrangler is the crudest Jeep, it is also the most capable off road. On the road it delivers a choppy ride, numb sterring feel with slow response, and clumsy handling. Noise is loud and constant. A long-wheelbase Unlimited model was added for 2005, bringing more cargo space and slightly more legroom in the back seat. Otherwise, the ride is still dreadful and the steering is imprecise. For 2007, a redesigned and more civilized Wrangler arrived. Ride and handling improved some, but low cornering limits and vague steering remained. Its 3.8-liter V6 lacked punch and returned just 15 mpg overall. A much better 3.6-liter V6 and a five-speed automatic arrived for 2012, and returned 17 mpg overall. Off-road capability remains impressive, particularly in Rubicon trim. But cabin access is a challenge and the interior is uncomfortable.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2017 N/A N/A
N/A
2016 $26,025 - $38,325 $23,235 - $35,185
2015 $24,775 - $37,075 $21,990 - $33,940
2014 $23,600 - $35,650 $20,840 - $32,540
2013 $21,175 - $32,875 $18,350 - $29,700
2012 $19,350 - $29,250 $16,465 - $26,090
2011 $16,800 - $25,025 $13,870 - $21,870
2010 $15,200 - $23,100 $12,275 - $19,915
2009 $14,175 - $21,025 $11,260 - $17,870
2008 $12,950 - $19,000 $10,070 - $15,880
2007 $11,675 - $17,275 $8,850 - $14,160
1997-2006
Jeep Wrangler 2006 Trim Shown: 2006 LWB
Touting a legacy that stretches back to World War II, the Wrangler is Jeep's smallest, least expensive, and crudest model. It's changed little since its 1986 introduction. Better off-road than on, it has abrupt, numb, routine handling, tricky emergency handling, and a very noisy, punishing ride. Revamped for the 1997 model year, the Wrangler regained round headlamps and received an improved interior. Otherwise, the basic formula continues, with cramped quarters, a dreadful ride, and vague, imprecise steering. The 2001 model features a quieter, better-padded convertible top. A four-speed automatic arrived for 2003, replacing the old three-speed unit.
Average Retail Price Trade-in Price Reliability Verdict Owner Satisfaction View Local Inventory
2006 $10,500 - $15,250 $7,730 - $12,205
2005 $9,650 - $14,150 $6,945 - $11,170
2004 $8,325 - $11,625 $5,670 - $8,770
2003 $7,450 - $11,400 $4,850 - $8,560
N/A
2002 $6,625 - $9,825 $4,075 - $7,085
2001 N/A N/A
N/A
2000 N/A N/A