Voltage. Power. Torque. It’s nice to know the specs of your cordless drill, but it’s what it can do that counts. “Theoretically, two models with the same amp-hour batteries of the same voltage should drive the same number of screws,” says CR test engineer Frank Spinelli. “That’s where you start to see differences.”

Spinelli translated the data collected on CR’s new dynamometer into the number of wood screws each model can drive on a full battery charge. Here’s the comparison of all models in our drill ratings that come with batteries rated between 1.3 and 1.5 amp-hours. Click on any drill for more information about it. (Drills appear here in alphabetical order.)

Black+Decker BDCDDBT120C
159
screws
Bosch DDB181-02
189
screws
DeWalt DC970K-2
124
screws
DeWalt DCD780C2
127
screws
DeWalt DCF610S2
95
screws
Hitachi DS10DFL2
82
screws
Hitachi DS18DGL
136
screws
Milwaukee 2407-22
114
screws
Porter-Cable PCC608LB
177
screws
Porter-Cable PCCK600LB
167
screws
Porter-Cable PCCK601LA
159
screws
Ridgid R82005K
100
screws
Ryobi P1811
152
screws
Worx WX176L
179
screws

Methodology: Total output in joules from run-time test on dynamometer divided by joules required to drive a 1½-inch #10 wood screw into common pine, as estimated from field test.