Best Gas Grills for $1,000 and Up

These impressive high-end models are built to last

When you shop through retailer links on our site, we may earn affiliate commissions. 100% of the fees we collect are used to support our nonprofit mission. Learn more.

close up of knobs and grates on Napoleon grill Photo: Jamie Chung

Spending $1,000 or more on a gas grill opens up your choices to beautifully built, large models loaded with features such as interior lighting, a pullout garbage bin, built-in storage, and more. Rotisserie lamb, anyone?

If you’re looking for a top-tier gas grill, you’ve come to the right place. Consumer Reports tests new gas grills each year, in every price range. We currently have almost 200 models in our gas grill ratings, and our test engineers are in the process of assessing even more in our labs. Dozens of models in our ratings cost over a grand.

More on Gas Grills & Grilling

“In addition to having lots of features, many of the grills you buy for more than $1,000 will also have an optional kit allowing you to convert it to run on natural gas,” says Mark Allwood, the market analyst who covers grills for Consumer Reports. “You’ll have the added expense of running a gas line outdoors, but that may be worthwhile with a pricier grill, because you’ll probably have that grill for years.”

Below, we’ve compiled a list of the very best gas grills costing $1,000 or more (often, much more), in medium and large sizes. (The most expensive small gas grill we tested costs $800.) If you’re unsure which size you need, or which features matter, start with our grill buying guide. CR members can also jump right into our complete gas grill ratings to compare more models.

Best Gas Grills for $1,000 and Up

From the 'Consumer 101' TV Show

Sturdy construction, even heating, flare-up reduction—Consumer Reports’ experts explain to Jack Rico, “Consumer 101” TV show host, what to look for when buying a gas grill.


Paul Hope

As a classically trained chef and an enthusiastic DIYer, I've always valued having the best tool for a job—whether the task at hand is dicing onions for mirepoix or hanging drywall. When I'm not writing about home products, I can be found putting them to the test, often with help from my two young children, in the 1860s townhouse I'm restoring in my free time.