How to Choose the Best Home Wall Charger for Your Electric Vehicle

Consumer Reports evaluated a group of wall-mounted chargers and found models to recommend

Home EV Chargers JuiceBox 40 Consumer Reports

As electric vehicles gain popularity, Consumer Reports decided to test several popular wall chargers that EV buyers might consider when purchasing a car.

We also asked a focus group of EV owners about what they need and like in a home charger, known in the industry as Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE).

We evaluated hardwired (permanently installed) and plug-in types, ranging in price from $300 to $700. The seven we list below performed similarly, but we learned about which features matter and which ones you might want to skip—or at least not buy as an extra. We list three staff favorites, too.

More on Electric Cars

Owners of pure electric cars may find it helpful to have a wall charger installed to get charging done in a few hours instead of overnight or over days. It's possible to recharge your EV or plug-in hybrid by simply using the supplied cable that came with the car and a nearby 120-volt outlet, the typical outlet in your house or garage. For most drivers, trickling electricity overnight may be adequate for addressing the range needs of a typical commute. Plug-in hybrids, with their limited battery capacity and ability to run on gasoline, probably don’t warrant the investment in a wall charger. But for drivers who periodically use 100+ miles of range in a single day, a wall charger is a convenience and a worthwhile investment.

The national average installation cost is $750, according to HomeAdvisor. Of course, costs will vary depending on your specific setup.

CR's Take

All of the EVSEs we evaluated did the job and are weatherproof, meaning they can be installed inside a garage or outside. We favor the plug-in type because of the portability; these chargers are easy to take with you when you move or even when you're on vacation, should you rent a home.

We found that a compact design and an easy-to-manage cable that’s long enough can help optimize garage space and maximize flexibility.

The ideal cable can reach to the car’s charge port whether its location on the car is front or rear, left or right. We found that a long 25-foot cable is handy. (Keep in mind that your next EV may not have the same port location.) A design that nicely integrates a hook for the unused cable portion is also convenient.

An app that communicates with you is handy, too, although most EVs allow you to view charging status and get notifications through the car manufacturers’ app.

In making your selection, it's important to understand all the features and know exactly where you want to mount the charger. Functions and size are ultimately the key differentiators among the name-brand ESVEs that we assessed. And finally, don’t be swayed by the lower prices, because the cheaper EVSEs often don’t charge as quickly.

The Chargers

The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer. They cost $300 to $700.

To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric-car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.

Staff Favorites

Our picks are the JuiceBox 40, ChargePoint Home Flex, and the Blink HQ 100.

JuiceBox 40
Price: $569

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Amazon (32-amp hardwire)
Amazon (32-amp plug-in)
Amazon (40-amp hardwire)
Amazon (40-amp plug-in)
ChargePoint Home Flex
PRICE: $699

CORD LENGTH: 23 FEET

RESUME CHARGING: Yes

WHERE TO BUY: Amazon, ChargePoint, Home Depot
Blink HQ 100
Price: $400

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon

The Other Chargers

Presented in alphabetical order.

ClipperCreek HCS-40/HCS-40P
Price: $565/$589

Cord Length: 25 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy HCS-40: Amazon, ClipperCreek

Where to Buy HCS-40P: Amazon, ClipperCreek
Evo Charge
Price: $479

Cord Length: 18 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy: Amazon (18 ft.), Amazon (25 ft.)
Siemens US2
PRICE: $412

CORD LENGTH: 20 FEET

RESUME CHARGING: YES

WHERE TO BUY:
Amazon, Home Depot
Tesla Mobile Charger Gen 2
Price: $275

Cord Length: 20 Feet

Resume Charging: Yes

Where to Buy:
Tesla

How to Choose the Right Charger

When shopping for an EVSE, consider the following:

  • Cable length: The length of the charge cable has an impact on where you can mount the EVSE and how easy it is to reach the charge port on the car. Remember that your next EV may have a charging port on a different location on the car, and you’ll want to be able to reach it.
  • Cable management: It’s handy to have a hook to wrap the unused portion of the cable around. Otherwise, if the cable is scattered, it adds clutter in the garage, collects dust, and might cause someone to trip over it. The ability to place the holster for the connector away from the unit might add flexibility in a tight single-car garage.
  • Size: A wide wall charger or a thick one that sticks out far from the wall may encroach on space or your flexibility in placing it in the garage. For instance, a narrow unit might fit between two garage doors and pose a minimum space intrusion.
  • Ease of plugging/unplugging: We like to see a high quality, substantial coupler that lets you smoothly and effortlessly plug and unplug in and out of the car’s port. A solid and secure holster is an advantage, and it gives you confidence that the coupler will stay secure.
  • Smart or dumb charging: Some EVSEs have a smartphone app that communicates with the unit over WiFi or through Bluetooth. With an app, you can monitor the charging and view various stats. This sounds like a nice feature to have, but it isn’t essential because most EVs have their own app that communicates with the car.
  • Ability to delay charging: You may benefit from cheaper off-peak electricity costs, depending on your utility company. In such cases, being able to easily delay charging can save real money. Some cars, like those from Tesla, allow you to control the charging time from within the car or via an app.
  • Resuming charging automatically after a power outage: If you live in an area that has frequent power outages, it’s nice to know that charging will resume once the power is back on. That's better than being surprised when your EV isn't sufficiently charged when you’re ready to drive.
  • Weatherproof: For those without a garage, look for an EVSE that can stand up to inclement weather. (Manufacturers of most of EVSEs claim that they're weatherproof.)
  • UL Listed: It’s wise to pick an EVSE that’s Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or ETL (Edison Testing Laboratories) listed, which indicates it complies with safety standards established by nationally recognized testing labs. Every charger featured here has such a safety rating, indicated with a seal.
  • Hardwired or a plug-in type: The early EVSEs were mostly hardwired, meaning they were permanently installed. Current offerings are mostly plug-in units. We prefer those because of their portability and easier installation. You may still need to have a professional electrician run a 240-volt line and install an appropriate outlet in your garage or outdoor location.

How We Tested

The units we evaluated can be bought online at Amazon, with the exception of the Tesla unit, which is sold only by the manufacturer.

They cost $300 to $700.

To help guide our evaluation, we asked electric car owners through a focus group and a survey about their home-charging concerns. Most participants were interested in convenience and usability in a charger, factoring in such things as cable management, ease of plugging/unplugging the connector, and whether or not charging resumes automatically after a power outage. With their feedback in mind, we installed each of these EVSEs to temporary walls at the Consumer Reports Auto Center and used them over the summer to charge our growing fleet of electric and plug-in hybrid test cars.

Shopping for an Electric Car or Plug-In Hybrid?

See our complete ratings.


Jeff S. Bartlett

A New England native, I have piloted a wide variety of vehicles, from a Segway to an aircraft carrier. All told, I have driven thousands of vehicles—many on race tracks across the globe. Today, that experience and passion are harnessed at the CR Auto Test Center to empower consumers. And if some tires must be sacrificed in the pursuit of truth, so be it. Follow me on Twitter (@JeffSBartlett).

Gabe Shenhar

I'm an engineer, test driver, auto journalist, and consumer advocate rolled into one. My 25+ years of experience includes taking cars to their limits and sometimes beyond, writing thousands of road test reports, participating in grassroots motorsports, and instructing advanced driving courses. If I’m not doing laps on the test track, I’m doing laps in the pool. Follow me on Twitter. (@CRCarsGabe)