SUVs are very versatile vehicles for transporting passengers and cargo, and now you don't have to sacrifice fuel economy to get the space and all-weather traction you want. In fact, many SUVs now have fuel economy on par with large sedans. Not surprisingly, there are hybrids and diesel SUVs leading several key categories, but as you'll see below, the most fuel-efficient SUVs are hybrids and small models with regular gasoline engines.

Among Consumer Reports' more than 50 vehicle tests are fuel-economy measurements. Our fuel-economy numbers are derived from a precision flow meter and are rounded to the nearest mile per gallon.

Overall mileage is calculated from equal portions of city and expressway driving. SUVs are bought and tested with all-wheel drive. (Learn more about how Consumer Reports tests cars.)

Below, we spotlight the top most fuel-efficient SUVs based on the overall fuel economy test results, omitting electric vehicles. Complete test results can be found by clicking through to the model pages.

See our list of the most fuel-efficient cars.


Toyota RAV4

Toyota RAV4

For years, the RAV4 has consistently been among the top-ranked small SUVs. The current RAV4's cabin is quieter, the ride is smoother, it has a suite of advanced safety features, and it offers a frugal hybrid version. The energetic 2.5-liter four-cylinder and smooth six-speed automatic returned 24 mpg overall in our tests of an AWD version. The hybrid version gets a terrific 31 mpg overall. Handling is responsive and very secure. Inside, the controls are clear and intuitive. Though the XLE comes with automatic climate control and a sunroof, you must step up to the Limited trim to get adjustable lumbar support and the more comfortable faux-leather seats. Access is very easy, and the rear seat is roomy. Starting with the 2017 model year, automatic emergency braking is standard.

Read the complete Toyota RAV4 Hybrid road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Toyota RAV4 Hybrid XLE

31

26

36


Lexus RX

Lexus RX

The RX has avant-garde exterior styling and lots of advanced safety features. Its 3.5-liter V6 is linked to an eight-speed automatic, delivering ample power and a commendable 22 mpg overall. The fuel-thrifty 450h hybrid gets an excellent 29 mpg overall. Inside, the RX is very quiet and well-finished. Ride comfort is plush, whether you get the base car on 18-inch tires or more uplevel versions with 20-inch tires. Handling, however, is ponderous and devoid of any sporty feel but ultimately secure. The mouselike controller and distracting interface require a steep learning curve. Rear passengers get lots of leg and knee room. The Lexus Safety System+, which includes automatic emergency braking and lane-departure warning, is standard.

Read the complete Lexus RX road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Lexus RX450h

29

24

33


Lexus NX

Lexus NX

The RX has avant-garde exterior styling and lots of advanced safety features. Its 3.5-liter V6 is linked to an eight-speed automatic, delivering ample power and a commendable 22 mpg overall. The fuel-thrifty 450h hybrid gets an excellent 29 mpg overall. Inside, the RX is very quiet and well-finished. Ride comfort is plush, whether you get the base car on 18-inch tires or more uplevel versions with 20-inch tires. Handling, however, is ponderous and devoid of any sporty feel but ultimately secure. The mouselike controller and distracting interface require a steep learning curve. Rear passengers get lots of leg and knee room. The Lexus Safety System+, which includes automatic emergency braking and lane-departure warning, is standard.

Read the complete Lexus NX road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Lexus NX 300h

29

23

34


Honda HR-V

Honda HR-V

Based on the Fit subcompact, the HR-V gets a versatile, cargo-friendly rear seat that flips up or folds down flat and low. Considerably smaller and less expensive than the CR-V, the HR-V is loud and the ride is stiff. Handling is responsive and secure. Power comes from a 141-hp four-cylinder driving either the front or all four wheels. But the HR-V feels underpowered, an impression amplified by the continuously variable transmission. The Honda's trump card is its excellent 29 mpg overall, very flexible interior, and generous rear seat and cargo room. The front seat is short on support, however. Available premium features include heated leather seats, a sunroof, and keyless entry, and a rearview camera is standard. We prefer the LX trim over the EX for its simpler audio controls.

Read the complete Honda HR-V road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Honda HR-V LX

29

20

39


Mazda CX-3

Mazda CX-3

Mazda's entry in the mini-utility segment delivers agile, fun-to-drive handling; a solid and substantial feel; and good fuel economy. The ride is firm but does a good job absorbing impacts, although noise levels can be high. The CX-3 is available with front- or all-wheel drive, and the sole powertrain is a 146-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder and a six-speed automatic. It's a smooth, willing mill but isn't overly powerful. The infotainment system includes a 7-inch center display screen and a rotary knob to control phone and audio functions, but it takes time to get familiar with its operation. The rear seat is very tight, and cargo space is modest. Blind-spot monitoring and adaptive cruise control are available.

Read the complete Mazda CX-3 road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Mazda CX-3 Touring

28

20

36


Honda CR-V

Honda CR-V

The redesigned CR-V gains features, space, and optional turbo power. While the base LX trim is fitted with a carryover 184-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, EX and above trims sport a 190-hp, 1.5-liter turbo. A continuously variable transmission is standard and works well with either engine. Fuel economy is impressive at 28 mpg overall for the EX. Handling is nimble and sure-footed, and the firm ride is steady. Road noise has been suppressed, resulting is a quieter cabin. The interior is very comfortable and roomy, particularly the rear seat, although the base LX's seat is less supportive. EX and above versions come with a 7-inch touch-screen infotainment system that offers Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility and Garmin navigation. They also have standard automatic emergency braking and blind-spot warning.

Read the complete Honda CR-V road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Honda CR-V EX (1.5T) / LX (2.4L)

28/27

20/19

37/36


Mercedes-Benz GLA

Mercedes-Benz GLA 250

Essentially a raised hatchback version of the CLA sedan, the GLA performed better in our tests than its sibling. It got 26 mpg overall from the 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder. But the seven-speed dual-clutch automatic is unrefined, and power delivery is not even. This makes the GLA feel lethargic at first, then power comes on abruptly. Handling is nimble, but the ride is stiff and the cabin is loud. Visibility, particularly to the rear, is poor, and headroom is snug. Safety features include a forward-collision mitigation system. Automatic emergency braking and blind-spot monitoring are optional. A front-drive version and a high-performance 375-hp GLA45 are available. The infotainment system has become more complicated for 2017 but is now compatible with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

Read the complete Mercedes-Benz GLA road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Mercedes-Benz GLA 250

26

19

35


Subaru Crosstrek

Subaru Crosstrek

The Crosstrek is a small quasi-SUV version of the previous-generation Impreza hatchback, with a raised ride height that gives it enough clearance to slosh through deeply rutted roads. It may appeal to those people who live at the end of a dirt road and don't want anything big and bulky. The cabin is rather noisy, the ride is stiff, and the 148-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine occasionally has to work hard, but fuel economy is a gratifying 26 mpg. A redesign based on the new Impreza arrived this summer. Judging by the new Impreza we have tested, the Crosstrek promises to be quieter, with a more comfortable ride. The more user-friendly infotainment system is a big improvement.

Read the complete Subaru Crosstrek road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Subaru Crosstrek Premium

26

19

34


Subaru Forester

Subaru Forester

Hitting the sweet spot among small SUVs, the Forester delivers a spacious interior, impressive safety equipment and crashworthiness, and outstanding visibility in a right-sized, affordable package. Fuel economy is excellent at 26 mpg overall, especially given the standard AWD. The ride is supple, and handling is very secure. Engine noise is pronounced when merging or climbing hills, however. Controls are straightforward and easy to use. The infotainment and connectivity systems have finally been updated with an intuitive touch screen. Midtrim Foresters bring a lot of content for the money, but it's easy to crest $30,000 with options packages. A feisty turbo comes with XT trim but compromises the value equation. The optional (and recommended) EyeSight system includes forward-collision warning and automatic emergency braking.

Read the complete Subaru Forester road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Subaru Forester 2.5i Premium

26

18

35


Hyundai Tucson

Hyundai Tucson

The Tucson is one of the better small SUVs, although neither of its powertrains is ideal. The base SE version gets a 164-hp, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, routing through a six-speed automatic. This version is rather slow and can feel strained. More expensive trims get a 1.6-liter turbo four-cylinder that uses a seven-speed automated manual transmission. This more powerful setup returned 26 mpg overall, but it suffers from a vibration at very low speeds, such as in parking maneuvers. Ride comfort, handling agility, and noise suppression are commendable. The rear seat is roomy, and controls are easy to use. Advanced safety features, including automatic emergency braking and blind-spot monitoring, are optional.

Read the complete Hyundai Tucson road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

Hyundai Tucson Sport (1.6T)

26

18

35


BMW X1

BMW X1

The X1 relies on a platform shared with the Mini Clubman and Countryman. Initially offered only with all-wheel drive, for 2017 a less expensive front-wheel-drive version joins the line. In our tests of the AWD X1 the responsive 228-hp, 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder engine returned 26 mpg overall. With a relatively low ride height, it feels almost like driving a BMW sedan. Although capable and responsive, ride and handling aren't up to BMW's high standards. Road noise is rather noticeable. The interior is typical BMW, with high-quality materials and switches, buttons, and knobs. The front seats are rather short and flat, however, and rear-seat passengers hit their shins against the backs for the front seats. Prices start at an inviting $33,100, but a typically equipped X1 easily breaks the $40,000 mark.

Read the complete BMW X1 road test.

Make & Model

Overall MPG

City MPG

Highway MPG

BMW X1 xDrive28i

26

17

37