Company's coming, and the mattress in the guest room is old and lumpy. And though you may be persnickety about your own mattress, you might be less choosy when buying one for a guest room as long as it's comfortable for most sleeping styles and doesn't cost a lot. You don't want folks to be too comfy, after all.

More on Mattresses

“The trick is finding a mattress that can suit a lot of different types of people for the right price,” says Chris Regan, a Consumer Reports engineer who oversees our mattress testing.

Easier said than done. That's why we put together this list of mattresses that won't empty your pocketbook but are as great for rickety Uncle Fred as they are for your spry nieces and nephews. You can find some models at a nearby store, and others you can order online to arrive in a matter of days.

And if you decide to be slightly less accommodating, check out the best and worst air mattresses from our tests.

How We Test Mattresses

At CR we buy and test queen-size mattresses because they're the most popular size. Using lab equipment and human subjects, we evaluate how well they support the body for both back and side sleepers, how easily sleepers can shift their weight without disturbing their partner, and how well the mattress keeps its shape over time.

To mimic the typical eight- to 10-year useful lifespan of a mattress, we conduct a mechanical test in which a 308-pound roller is pushed over each model 30,000 times. For firmness, rather than take a manufacturer’s word for it, we measure that attribute precisely for each mattress we test and plot the results on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the firmest. 

We test mattresses from the big names you'd expect, such as Sealy, Serta, Stearns and Foster, and Tempur-Pedic. We also look at direct-to-consumer brands such as Casper and Tuft & Needle, and bring in mattresses with innovative construction, such as the Reverie, which consists of foam springs you can rearrange to adjust firmness, and the Purple, which has a rubberlike grid as a top layer to promote airflow.

CR members can read on for ratings and reviews for nine of the best mattresses for guest rooms from Consumer Reports' tests. They're relatively inexpensive and easy to find online or at a store near you.

Prices are for queen-size mattresses and don’t include a box spring or foundation.

Best Innerspring Mattresses for Guest Rooms

These traditional mattresses are composed of steel coils in various configurations. The most widely sold, they tend to be the least expensive.

Top Picks

1

Average back sleeper
Average side sleeper
Stabilization

2

Average back sleeper
Average side sleeper
Stabilization
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Best Foam Mattresses for Guest Rooms

The foam mattress category is seeing the most innovation, with a flurry of beds-in-a-box coming onto the market.

Top Picks

1

Average back sleeper
Average side sleeper
Stabilization

2

Average back sleeper
Average side sleeper
Stabilization
Unlock Mattress Ratings
Become a Member or Sign in

Tips for Buying a Mattress

Tossing and turning all night? Maybe it’s time for a new mattress. On the "Consumer 101" TV show, Chris Regan, a CR expert,  shares tips on what to look for when mattress shopping.