Recalled Graco infant inclined sleepers
The recalled Graco infant inclined sleepers can stand alone or attach to the top of a play yard.
Photo: CPSC

Graco today recalled about 51,000 infant inclined sleepers because infant deaths have been tied to other, similar inclined sleep products, according to an announcement from the Consumer Product Safety Commission

Today’s recall involves inclined sleepers sold as accessories that can stand alone or attach to the following play yards: the Pack ’n Play Day2Dream Playard With Bedside Sleeper, Graco Pack ’n Play Nuzzle Nest Playard, Graco Pack ’n Play Everest Playard, and Graco Pack ’n Play Rock ’n Grow Playard.

There have been no incidents or injuries reported with the Graco products recalled today. But other similar products, such as the Fisher-Price Rock ’n Play Sleeper and Kids II rocking inclined sleepers, have been linked to 93 reported infant deaths and more than 1,000 incidents, including serious injuries.

The CPSC says consumers should immediately stop using the recalled inclined sleepers but can continue to use the play yard and its other components. For recall instructions, see below. 

A Series of Recalls

This announcement marks the eleventh recall of inclined sleepers, and comes more than a year and a half after Consumer Reports uncovered dozens of deaths in connection with the Fisher-Price Rock ’n Play Sleeper and other inclined sleepers. To date, CR’s investigation has prompted the recall of more than 5.6 million inclined sleepers sold by companies such as Fisher-Price, Graco, Evenflo, Delta, and more.

More on Infant Sleep Products

This is Graco’s second inclined sleeper recall; the first was the recall of about 111,000 Graco Little Lounger Rocking Seats almost a year ago, in January 2020.

A Graco spokesperson told CR that the company decided to recall the inclined sleeper accessories now “due to new regulation and after closely following incidents, injuries, and fatalities involving other manufacturers’ products” and added that Graco is no longer selling inclined sleepers. 

Oriene Shin, CR’s policy counsel for product safety, congratulated the CPSC on today’s recall. But, she says, “some inclined products marketed for sleep still haven’t been recalled despite the clear danger they pose to infants. We urge these products’ manufacturers—including Baby Delight, Chicco, and Hiccapop—to cooperate with the CPSC and issue recalls immediately.”

See a list of the inclined sleep products that have been recalled.

The Risk of Inclined Sleepers

Why are inclined sleepers so dangerous? Research shows that infant inclined sleep products—which are designed to put babies to bed at an incline between 10 degrees and 30 degrees—are not a safe sleep environment for babies. The products increase the risk of airway compression, suffocation, and death because they allow babies’ heads to slump forward, blocking airflow, even while lying on their back, buckled into the product. Additionally, the inclined sleepers make it easier for babies to roll over onto their side or stomach with their face pressed into the sleeper’s fabric, interfering with breathing.

Inclined sleepers run counter to safe sleep recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The organization states that babies should be put to bed on their backs, alone, unrestrained, and on a firm, flat surface that is free of bumpers and other soft bedding.

Graco’s recall today is one of a spate of actions that have been taken by manufacturers, consumer advocates, and lawmakers to prevent infant inclined sleepers from harming babies.

In October 2019, the CPSC warned consumers not to use any infant inclined sleep products and proposed banning all such sleepers from the market. And in December 2019, the House of Representatives passed the Safe Sleep for Babies Act—which would ban the manufacture and sale of inclined sleepers and padded crib bumpers. The legislation is currently awaiting a vote in the Senate.  

While the proposed ban and legislation have yet to be implemented, several major retailers, including Amazon, Buy Buy Baby, eBay, and Walmart, told CR they pulled all infant inclined sleepers from their stores and websites in December 2019, a move that was applauded by Robert Adler, the acting chairman of the CPSC.

Consumer Reports has called for the CPSC and companies to get all infant inclined sleep products off the market and out of people’s homes. CR also strongly supports the legislation in Congress to ban the manufacture, import, and sale of inclined sleepers altogether.

Recall Details

Products recalled: Graco Pack ’n Play Day2Dream Playard & Bedside Sleeper, models 2034085, 2048753, and 2053215; Graco Pack ’n Play Nuzzle Nest Playard, models 1947177 and 1896392; Graco Pack ’n Play Everest Playard, models 1946902 and 1946903; Graco Pack ’n Play Rock ’n Grow Playard, model 2105055.

Sold at: Stores and online retailers including Amazon, Babies R Us, BuyBuyBaby, and Target for $270 to $350. The products were sold from November 2017 through September 2020 for Day2Dream Playard & Bedside Sleeper; from May 2015 through December 2018 for Nuzzle Nest Playard; from September 2015 through December 2018 for Everest Playard; and from December 2019 through April 2020 for Rock ’n Grow Playard.

The problem: Inclined sleep products—which are designed to put babies to bed at an incline between 10 degrees and 30 degrees—are not a safe sleep environment. Inclined sleepers can block an infant’s airflow and lead to death.

The fix: Consumers should immediately stop using the inclined sleeper accessory and contact Graco for a refund equal to the value of the accessory. You will be asked to fill out a recall form in order to receive a prepaid shipping label, a return mailing envelope, and instructions on how to send in a portion of the cover of the inclined sleeper accessory.

Consumers can continue to use the play yard portion of the product as well as other components included with the play yard.

How to contact the manufacturer: Call Graco at 800-345-4109 or go to the company’s recall page.

To report a dangerous product or product-related injury, go to SaferProducts.gov.